unhealthy habits

Ideas To Help You Break Unhealthy Habits

Struggling with an unhealthy habit can discourage us to the verge of giving up. It may feel overwhelming to come face to face with that mountain. However, rest assured that the mountain can be moved. 

By observing the steps below, you can be readily equipped on how to break any addiction or unhealthy habit.  

What Is A Bad Or Unhealthy Habit?

As defined by ‘Medical Dictionary,’ an unhealthy habit is ‘A patterned behavior regarded as detrimental to physical or mental health.’ If these behavioral patterns are left unchecked, they can progress into a much more serious issue. This is why it is vital to combat these problems at the root before they blossom into something more. 

How Are Habits And Addictions Related?

Bad habits are a milder precedent to addiction yet are no less severe as they ultimately lead to addiction. Taking your unhealthy habits seriously is what will spare you from relapse.

Preventing habitually unhealthy routines will ensure that the next step of addiction will not take hold of your life. Viewing your unhealthy habits from this perspective will help you grasp the necessity of altering your behavioral pattern.

Also, identifying the correlation between a habit and an addiction helps us follow through with the necessary steps to overcoming bad habits in recovery.

How To Break Any Addiction Or Habit

Much like addiction, it can be difficult to accept a change that needs to be made. Once a behavioral pattern is established, it becomes impulsive and, in many cases, escapes personal recognition. Again, these unhealthy patterns in our lives develop those habits that lead to relapse. 

Accept a Change Must be Made

By identifying the unhealthy patterns affecting you mentally or physically, you can then determine what needs to be altered or removed from your life. Without first accepting that a change in behavior needs to be made, one cannot make the necessary adjustments. Only then can one proceed with the following keys that can be life-altering if taken to heart. By equipping you with the tools below, you will have the power to break any habits that before seemed improbable.

No “Just in case” Exceptions

What this means is don’t make a “just in case” plan to revert to old habits. If you’re breaking a smoking habit, don’t leave a pack in your drawer ”‘just in case” you want one. You will always want one, and temptation is a daily battle. Don’t open yourself up to the opportunity to revert. 

This will always lead to relapse. Ultimately, the breaking or developing of any habit comes down to a personal choice. You need to choose that there’s no turning back.

Have A Stronger Accountability Partner

This isn’t to say the individual is stronger than you as a person. This simply means your struggles require the support of an individual stronger in the areas that you are not. For example, one with a smoking habit would be unwise to choose an accountability partner with a smoking problem. Oft times, two friends with the same addiction will make a pact with rightful intentions. The outcome, however, is likely to have adverse effects on both parties.

Have a dependable accountability partner who is strong in the areas of which you are weakest. More importantly, allow them to assert that role in your life without backlash. If you truly wish to break any habit or addiction, you must be willing to accept the council of your peers. Once beginning the process of breaking any addiction or habit, an accountability partner is there to encourage you every step of the way.

Take Baby Steps

Many people fail to break the bonds of their addiction simply by trying to do too much, too soon. The most important thing to consider when breaking any unhealthy habitual pattern is to not take on more than you can chew. If you attempt to tackle the big picture immediately, you are likely to get discouraged and give up. 

Think of breaking your unhealthy habits the same way one would consider building muscle in the weight room. You don’t enter the gym for the first time and immediately attempt to lift a 50 lb dumbbell in each hand(and if you did, I would hurt with you). You begin with a 2-5lb dumbbell and gradually work your way up.

In the context of breaking habits of an unhealthy nature, hone in on one single pattern you need to change in your life. Take tiny progressive victories in disrupting those patterns. Identify one aspect or behavior you wish to change and focus on that for a while. 

Train Your Thoughts

Before any habit is performed, it is first developed in the mind. Instead of thinking of the habit as pleasurable, remember all the negatives it poses in your life. Use the negatives of that unhealthy habitual pattern to fuel your disdain of the act itself.

Furthermore, when the desire to indulge an old habit comes to mind, hold that thought hostage. Consider how and why that thought came about. Was it a friend that fueled the desire? Was it a place? Were you lonely? Whatever source caused the desire to enter your mind, avoid that source at all costs. 

The Causes Of Bad Habits In Recovery

Accomplishing anything in life takes work, and continued effort in your recovery is no different. Many relapses occur because of a progressive lax in standards. Several factors contribute to loosening the standards you worked so hard to implement. Here are just a couple of key factors that can cause us to be susceptible to falling into old patterns.

Make A Plan For Hard Times

Remember, while you may not have control over what goes on around you, you have control over the choices you make. Ultimately, only you choose whether or not you wish to continue in good habits. When the circumstances you can’t control overcome you, overcome them with the choices you can control.

Everybody goes through difficult times in variable forms. A break-up, financial struggle, or other negative factors can discourage us from succumbing to old habits.

Wrong Influences

Influences that encourage unhealthy habits will persuade you to feel comfortable in your strongholds. As difficult as it may be, rid yourself of these negative influences and replace them with positive ones.

A wise counselor once said, “You show me your friends; I’ll show you your future.” Until you come to the point of repetitively falling into old habits, you’ll never understand the gravity of this statement. Remember, ultimately, you make the decision.

Becoming Stagnant

After conquering your habit, it’s easy to get too comfortable. This is when we can become stagnant, and our standards can ease into former impulses. Keeping yourself busy will help you eliminate such opportunities to regress into former routines. 

Bad Habits And The Addictive Personality

An addictive personality is a natural tendency deep inside you that desires to perform those unhealthy former habits. Controlling your habits of an unhealthy nature is important because they directly relate to the addictive personality. 

Generally, individuals with this personality type can grow attached or obsessive about anything. While it may seem harmless to get attached to a video game or a person, these actions can easily be transferred to your unhealthy habits like substance use disorder. 

Learning how to recognize addictive traits and actions is a must. Individuals suffering from an addictive personality should seek ongoing therapy as it’s much more difficult for them to stop. Therapists can help addictive personality types identify triggers and work with them to rewire behaviors. 

The Dangers Of Bad Habits In Recovery

Before relapse, it is always an unhealthy habit that first leads to relapse. Allow me to illustrate; An alcoholic’s impulsive habit would be to go to the liquor store and buy a drink. Ultimately, the trip to the store, rather than the act of drinking itself, led to the relapse. 

Keeping old habits at bay will, in turn, prevent the addictive personality from taking over.

How To Overcome Bad Habits In Recovery

Just because some old habits may have arisen to the surface doesn’t mean you’ve relapsed into those routines. It is not too late to stop them as long as you take action now. The guidance below will aid you in how to break any habit or addiction.

Don’t Allow Setbacks to “Set You Back”

Most people make the dire mistake of thinking they have to be perfect. Don’t allow a single setback to discourage you from relapsing. Remember the progress you’ve made. Instead of utilizing your slip as grounds to revert, allow the lesson to motivate you forward. It isn’t the mistake that matters, but how you respond to the mistake.

Don’t Just Stop, Replace

Don’t just simply attempt to abstain from your unhealthy habit, or you’ll spend more time dwelling on it. Instead, replace this habit with something you enjoy doing. Whatever it may be, what you fill this void with can be your greatest asset to breaking any addiction. 

Continue to Seek Help From Counseling

Continued counseling equals continued recovery. Therapy doesn’t(or shouldn’t) stop once you have defeated your unhealthy habits or addictions. Too many individuals make the mistake of canceling their therapy sessions once in recovery. This is the most important time to keep up those sessions. How long it takes you to break a habit or addiction could very easily be determined by the choice of continuing.

Are You Facing An Unhealthy Habit? 

Merely observing these suggestions speaks volumes that you are faced with an imminent crossroads. Letting another moment pass without action is another moment you slip deeper into habits that are detrimental to your progress. By taking the admirable step of seeking out this article, now you’re ready for a true call to action.

Our team of addiction treatment specialists at Granite Mountain Behavioral Health can help you overcome unhealthy habits today! Our intensive outpatient program is geared towards helping individuals identify triggers and working with therapists, all while they continue attending school or work. Learn how to break any addiction. 

journaling in addiction recovery

The Power and Benefits Of Journaling In Addiction Recovery

Journaling is a powerful tool that allows you to express your innermost feelings and thoughts through writing. Granite Mountain Behavioral Healthcare is here to help with this process. We focus on empowering you or your loved one to believe that success is possible in your addiction recovery. Our staff will strive to help you or your loved one reach and maintain your goal of sobriety.

Writing down your thoughts and emotions can create a sense of freedom and release. Recovery journaling is an important process that can promote healing. This process allows you the freedom to express your joys, sorrows, and frustrations. There is no pressure and no judgment of what you write about.

Journaling – either on paper or digitally – can help you deal with the stress and anxiety that you may feel during addiction recovery. It is a therapeutic way to deal with emotions or events. The events may have happened in your past, or it may be current events or future events that you are concerned about.

The History of Journaling

People have kept diaries and journals for as long as there has been handwriting. Journaling for therapeutic reasons became well known in the 1960s because Dr. Ira Progoff started offering workshops and classes on the “Intensive Journal Method”. As the years went on his journaling methods became very popular.

The popularity of journaling as a form of anxiety and stress relief caused medical groups to take a closer look. Using journaling for therapeutic reasons made a lot of sense. It was found to be useful in group therapy as well as one-on-one therapy.

Today’s journaling is done in many formats. Handwritten journals are still popular, but many digital journals are used as well. Popular digital forms of journaling include blogs, Facebook, and Twitter.

How Can Journaling Benefit Me?

Writing down your thoughts, whether they are happy or sad, is beneficial and can greatly help in your addiction recovery process. Journaling has healing powers. It allows you the ability to read back through your entries to see how you have progressed in your journey. This form of self-realization and expression allows you to self-analyze your progress.

There are many benefits to writing in a journal. Some of the benefits of journaling in recovery include:

  • Stress relief
  • Lessen feelings of anxiety
  • Brings about a feeling of accomplishment
  • Provides a way to focus on goals
  • Promotes inner peace
  • Encourages emotional awareness
  • Allows you to see things from a different perspective

The Different Types of Recovery Journals

Recovery journaling may look different for you than for others. You may choose to have one single journal or have multiple journals where each has a different intention. The nice thing about journaling is that there is no “right” or “wrong” way to do it. You choose what works for you.

The various forms of journals that you may choose from are:

Diary Journal

This form of journaling is used to document daily events. You may decide to include your daily struggles and/or celebrations. You may find that writing down your thoughts about events that happen each day provides comfort and gives you focus.

Reflection Journal 

Your journal entries in a reflection journal may be brief and written at the end of each day. This is the time that you take to write down the decisions you made, and the outcome of those decisions, and how you felt. It is the hope that this form of journaling relaxes you to allow for a peaceful night’s sleep.

Gratitude Journal 

Journaling about the things that you are grateful for each day can bring about good feelings and create a positive outlook. Many gratitude journals prompt you to write down three to five things you are grateful for. This positivity will provide a hopeful feeling, and can cause you to see that a future free of drugs and alcohol is possible.

Spiritual Journal 

This form of journaling allows you to focus on your future and what you would like to become. It provides a way for you to document your spiritual journey through the recovery process. This type of journaling can happen throughout the day.

Health Journal 

This journal allows you to write down how you are physically and mentally feeling throughout the day. It provides an opportunity to look back at past entries and follow how the state of your health progresses.

Goal Journal 

Journal entries focus on short-term as well as long-term goals. This type of journaling provides a place for you to track your progress. You can look back at your entries and see what did and did not work. It is through these journal entries that you can find ways to achieve your goals.

What Are Some Prompts To Motivate You To Journal While In Recovery?

Deciding what to write about may not come easy for you. This may change as you become accustomed to writing down your feelings and emotions. Each day brings different challenges and you may need some help in starting a journal entry.

It is important to know that everyone has their unique style of journaling. Some prefer to write with ink, and some prefer a pencil. Others prefer to type their feelings out on a keyboard, or even on their phone. There is no right or wrong way to journal. The important thing is to find what works for you and do it.

When the words to start a journal entry just won’t come to mind there are many prompts to encourage you. Here are some examples:

  • Dear past me …
  • Dear present me …
  • Dear future me …
  • What makes you smile? Write down 10 things that make you smile.
  • What I wish others knew about me is …
  • My short-term goals are …
  • My long-term goals are …
  • Write a goodbye letter to someone who you want to remove from your life during your recovery process.
  • What are three things you do better than most people?
  • Write down one of your favorite memories.

Can Journaling Prevent Relapse?

Relapse is a very real and scary part of the recovery process. It is important to find outlets that can remove triggers and temptations that could cause you to relapse. Journaling can become one of those outlets.

The addiction recovery process requires you to look at yourself in a different light. Writing in a recovery journal can help you or your loved one with that process. Expressing yourself on paper or digitally inspires you to take a deeper look into what triggers may cause you to relapse.

Finding ways to prevent relapse in addiction recovery is key. Journaling allows your mind to relax and focus on events or emotions that may be bottled up. It is a form of self-care that is recommended because you are in control of what you decide to put down on paper.

Journaling can help in relieving the pressures of everyday life. These pressures create the potential for relapse. Writing down your feelings allows you to evaluate situations and handle things at your own pace.

How To Use Journaling To Maintain A Sober Life

Something as simple as finding exactly the right journal can be enough inspiration to make you want to write. It may be the cover or the color or the material that the journal is made of – whatever it takes to motivate you is fine.

It is important to remember these suggestions when journaling:

  • Entries always need to be honest. This is necessary to grow and learn. You will find that honest entries will help you be honest as a person. Your journal is a place where you can face the events and emotions in your life without the worry of being judged or reprimanded.
  • Always celebrate every victory – whether small or large – through your writing. Your accomplishments will provide the self-esteem needed to move forward on your journey to addiction recovery.
  • Find a quiet place to write down your thoughts. A calm, serene environment will allow you to dedicate your focus and energy to your entries.
  • Keep your recovery journal close at hand. You never know when the urge may strike to write something down. If your journal is available you may find that it becomes a way to process the thought, emotion, or situation that overcomes you.
  • Remember to take the time to look back at past entries. You may find a lot of therapeutic benefits in reading past thoughts. You may also be surprised at the amount of progress you have made as to the days and weeks pass. This progress will be motivation for you to maintain your life of sobriety.

Granite Mountain Behavioral Healthcare has an addiction treatment program that can transform your or your loved one’s life. We are ready to speak with you about the available options. Our staff is available to answer any questions about the services we offer. We look forward to helping you accomplish your goal of living a life free from drugs and alcohol.

 

 

trauma informed care

What is Trauma-Informed Care?

There are many reasons why a person may fall into addiction and all its effects. While some people may ignore the reasons – this is an important part of the treatment process. One of the main reasons why many people become addicted to alcohol or drugs is because of past trauma. Over the years, it has been shown that many of those who struggle with addiction do so because of trauma. This is why trauma-informed care is essential during the recovery process. 

Trauma is considered an extremely stressful/scarring event or experience that affects a person deeply. If left untreated, these traumas can fester and become a reason to start using drugs or alcohol. Trauma and addiction treatment is a completely different situation than tackling trauma. It’s important to truly understand how these traumas play a role in a person’s substance abuse and addiction in general. 

It’s important to practice trauma-informed care so the root of the issue is resolved. Avoiding or ignoring the reason why a person is abusing drugs in the first place is problematic in the long run. Rehab centers like Granite Mountain can help you come to terms with your past trauma while overcoming your addiction one step at a time. Addiction treatment is a patient and long process but in the end, it’s worth it for a healthier and better life. 

What is Trauma?

Trauma is an event or experience that overwhelms and impacts a person’s sense of security/coping ability. Traumas vary from person to person and vary in severity. What one person might forget another person may be scarred by. Trauma can be a distressing event or something more mundane like their parents divorcing. These traumas can lead to years of repressed feelings and stress in a person’s life. 

Common traumas a person may experience may include:

  • Death of a loved one, close friend, or friend
  • Witnessing violence or abuse (themselves or loved one)
  • Living in a household with an addicted or abusive parent
  • Illness and disease (life-threatening) 
  • War experiences
  • Sexual assault or abuse 
  • Witnessing or being involved in a severe accident
  • Witnessing a death
  • Natural disasters

In reality, a traumatic experience can be anything at all. The main impact is how a person reacts to this trauma in their life. Many people tend to turn to drugs and alcohol to cope with these memories and past traumas. This can end up leading to dependence and addiction in the long run. When people get the treatment it’s important to approach it with the lens of trauma-informed care. This means looking at trauma as part of addiction treatment. 

Signs and Symptoms of Trauma

Trauma can end up leading to more intense conditions such as Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) which can be accompanied by depression and anxiety. A person’s trauma can lead to several different symptoms and problems in a person’s life. Some of the most common symptoms of trauma and PTSD include:

  • Nightmares
  • Anger/irritable
  • Avoiding certain events associated with a traumatic event
  • Flashbacks or reliving the traumatic event
  • Hopelessness and despair
  • Confusion
  • Memory loss

If you or a loved one is frequently experiencing these symptoms they may be dealing with PTSD. 

Trauma and Addiction 

The symptoms and emotions of these past traumas can be tough for a person to handle and cope with. They may seem overwhelming and distressing (sometimes frequently). As a result, people turn to drugs and alcohol to cope with the effects and to self-medicate. Self-medicating like this can be seen in those who struggle with mental disorders as well. This is usually a temporary solution and ends up causing more problems in the long run.

This is why trauma and addiction treatment should be treated together. Understanding that a person has had a traumatic experience in the past and is drinking because of it can make treatment more effective. Practicing trauma-informed care helps pinpoint the exact reasons why a person began drinking, to begin with. By coming to terms and coping with these feelings, a person can focus on getting help both mentally and physically. 

Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs)

In 1998 a study was conducted by the CDC (Centers for Diseases Control) to see the effects of adverse childhood experiences on a person’s health in the long-term. This study (as well as many future studies) showed that children with traumatic childhoods have an increased risk of developing drug and alcohol disorders as adults  The study was called the ACE study and several of the experiences identified as traumatic included:

  • Divorced parents
  • Neglect (physical or emotional)
  • Racism and bullying
  • Living in foster homes
  • Experiencing violence
  • Sexual, physical, or emotional abuse
  • Domestic violence
  • Living with a parent struggling with a mental illness or substance problem
  • Growing up in an unsafe neighborhood

The study determined that if a child experienced at least four of these they had an increased rate of developing depression, alcohol/drug abuse, and anxiety (among other conditions). Unfortunately, the trauma continues to affect thousands of children every year. Cases of trauma can negatively change how a person’s mind grows and develops. 

Trauma-Informed Care and Addiction Treatment

Luckily, many addiction treatment centers like Granite Mountain can integrate treatment for both addiction and trauma/PTSD. This is considered a case of co-occurring disorders. Co-occurring disorders (also known as dual diagnosis) occur when a person is dealing with both an addiction and a mental disorder (in this case PTSD). These cases can be very problematic if left untreated. As mentioned, trauma can be the reason why someone abuses drugs – in turn, their symptoms worsen which circles back to more drug use. It’s because of this that trauma and addiction treatment should be guided together. 

Trauma-informed care is a vital part of the process and allows for the best chances of recovery as well as a better life. The trauma-informed approach takes into account the past traumas and negative experiences in a recovering addict’s life. By creating a comprehensive treatment plan and following the principles of trauma-informed care.

How Does Trauma-informed Care Work?

Trauma-informed care uses several principles to help a person cope and understand their past traumas while tackling addiction. This is a process that requires both the therapist and the patient. Let’s take a look at the different principles of trauma-informed care during treatment:

  • Safety – The therapist needs to create a safe and open environment for the person, this is crucial to the success
  • Transparency/Trustworthiness – Before a person can open up about their past traumas there must be a certain level of trust in the therapist and the rehab center as well. A center like Granite can provide an extensive level of care and transparency. 
  • Collaboration and Mutual help – No matter who is getting treatment, a collaboration between other peers, therapists, and the staff is crucial. This goes hand-in-hand with the idea of trust. 
  • Peer Support – Sharing your story with others who have experienced trauma (as well as hearing their stories) is a very effective way to work through your feelings. Peer support is a vital part of almost all trauma and addiction treatment cases. 
  • Cultural, Gender, and Other Issues – Understanding topics of race, gender, age, religion, identity, ethnicity, and geography should be set as the ground rules. With this in mind, it’s important to honor and value these topics respectfully and openly – as these could be related to the trauma as well.
  • Empowering voice and choice – Part of the journey should be to reward and recognize the strength of those willing to battle their trauma (as well as recovering from addiction). Promoting the healing promise and empowering those who are struggling is a vital part of the process. 

There should be a strong relationship between the therapist and the person getting help. This should be a relationship of trust, professionalism, and support from beginning to end. No matter how bad things may appear, with the right help, you can overcome addiction and trauma. Trauma-informed care should be practiced with care and respect to achieve all goals set by the therapist and person struggling with the trauma. 

Receiving Trauma and Addiction Treatment

Approaching addiction takes a qualified and supportive team of specialists, that’s where our team at Granite Mountain comes in. The process of dealing with trauma and addiction involves multiple elements such as therapy, detox, and medication in some cases. Getting addiction treatment usually starts with detox and moves onto more quality treatment such as inpatient or outpatient treatment (depending on the case at hand). 

Start the Journey at Granite Behavioral Healthcare

Dealing with trauma and substance abuse can be a tricky and stressful situation. However, trauma and addiction treatment is an option. At Granite, our incredible staff is ready to help you overcome those hurdles with a trauma-informed care approach and a supportive environment the whole way. Don’t let addiction and past trauma ruin your life any longer, take the first step towards sobriety and a better life. Contact us today to learn about our addiction treatment options and mental health services. 

References:

https://www.ajpmonline.org/article/S0749-3797(98)00017-8/pdf

https://www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/aces/index.html

https://www.nctsn.org/what-is-child-trauma/trauma-types

 

Rebuilding Your Life After Addiction

Rebuilding Your Life After Addiction: 10 Tips for a New Start

Suddenly entering a drug and alcohol recovery program and becoming sober is difficult enough, but rebuilding your life after addiction can only complicate things more. Initially, you’ll have to conquer withdrawal symptoms and cravings to use again. Returning to the real world and continuing a sober lifestyle after spending years of substance abuse addict can be like coming out of a cave. 

The transitional process will require several changes, steps, and resolutions that must be strictly followed to be successful. This is crucial if you’re working on your recovery or recently become sober and want to continue that path after rehab

After spending an amount of time in treatment, the transition process of rebuilding your life after addiction can be challenging and will require several steps. Here are ten tips to rebuilding your life after addiction.

Step 1: Slow and Steady Wins The Race

Often, those who are recently rebuilding their life after addiction believe they’re suddenly ready to jump back right into the world. But they’ll usually realize quickly they’re very far from being 100% ready. You’ll feel reinvigorated and recharged and living life to its fullest, but you should moderate. Lifes pace will likely feel quite differently now, and it might take time to reacclimate. But remember, regarding substance addiction recovery, slow and steady wins the race!

Step 2: Make Things Right 

Chance are, in the substance-abusing days, you did bad things or failed during that previous lifestyle. Even though these things happened during the addiction era, these actions had still caused people to become upset or have animosity. However, most loved ones will be happy to have you back healthy and sober and begin to realize the influence of old wounds can heal as time goes on. It is crucial to quickly and efficiently find ways to repair any damage you previously caused and make sure you make things right.

Step 3: Do What’s Expected of You

Another step to take when mending relationships with friends and family and to find out what they expect and need from you and their expectations of your behavior when dealing with them. For example, if you began using drugs and alcohol as a teen, and now you’re in your late 20’s, the early ’30s, life has changed. You may only remember things back when you were sober and a functioning family member, but those roles and expectations in those relationships have also changed. 

This discussion isn’t only for your sake, but for the sake of your loved ones too. They’ve gotten used to viewing you as a substance abuser and will continue to think of you that way unless you can show them differently. They may even expect too much now that you are back to being sober. Follow the rules and do what’s expected of you to help make loved ones view the present and form more practical standards moving forward.

10 Tips for a New Start

Step 4- Follow Through

Life after rehab will be tough enough adjusting to life and finding time to discuss in detail what is expected of you. But now that friends and family have given you the ground rules, moving forward, now you’ll have to follow through on it. You beat substance abuse and addiction, and now the time has come to change other habits correlating to how you relate to others, things you do for them, handling obligations, and more. 

People you speak with may be duly impressed by the interest you display in what they believed and required to consider their expectations. But what will impress them and help form a solid relationship is by following through on your commitments, now and long term.

Step 5: Leave Old Friends Behind

After leaving rehab, it is crucial to cut ties with all previous substance abusing and addicted friends from the past. Regardless of the support, they claim they’ll give you during your path to sobriety, the fact is their presence will only stall your progress. Even in situations where it’s a good friend or even a family member, they will bring you down and possibly trigger you to use again. 

During individual psychotherapy sessions, you’ll learn that even friends and family members who are happy that you’ve become sober still may not fully support your new lifestyle. But dont take that personally. They’re just afraid you’ll push your get clean ways and lifestyle onto them. They realize your lives are going in entirely different directions with them on the opposing end of the spectrum. 

Even if that’s not the case and you still fully support each other, hanging with others getting drunk or high will only tempt you. Being around them can at any moment trigger a relapse, so stay away or keep it at busy, formal meeting places. No amount of sentiment is worth your health, happiness, and especially your sobriety! Leave old friends behind.

Step 6: Finding New Hobbies

Back in the substance-abusing days, everyday life probably revolved around seeking and consuming drugs or alcohol. And the moments you weren’t occupied with using substance were perhaps overshadowed by thoughts of when and how you were going to schedule using again. So, now that you’re clean, what will you do with your free time now? 

Substance addiction has left a giant hole in your life, and now is the time for you to fill that hole with something productive, engaging, and fun. Finding new hobbies is easy; try by volunteering, pursuing further education, or other positive and fulfilling hobbies to keep new life on the right path.

Step 7: Start Exercising

Think back to the days of drinking and abusing substances. How often did you work out during that period? Although now you’re clean and sober, are you in good health? Those who start exercising can feel a world of difference regarding improving overall brain health, boosting energy levels, feeling of self-confidence, and sense of well-being. 

Whether it’s hiking, swimming, yoga, cycling, pilates, joining a gym, or a team sport, exercise can take things to a whole other level. Another reason to start exercising is to meet others dedicated to living a healthy lifestyle, which will help support your newly found healthy habits.

Step 8: Start Dieting

Like most people who’ve spent years abusing substances, you likely didn’t have the best diet throughout that period. Your body’s condition is influenced by what you eat, and it may now be showing signs of malnutrition caused by long term neglect. It is crucial to minimize fats, cut junk food out from your diet, cut out sugar and unhealthy food and eat fresh fruit, veggies, fish, and lean meats daily. Also, drink lots of water and cut back on coffee or energy drinks. 

A comprehensive health change won’t happen overnight, but over time, your tastes will change, and you’ll start craving healthy food. Next, you’ll begin to see extraordinary changes in appearance, immunity, energy level, and overall health. But it only happens when you start dieting.

rebuilding your life after addiction

Step 9: Get Plenty of Rest

Whatever your sleep schedule was in the substance-abusing era, it probably wasn’t very conducive to providing good mental and physical health. Staying up all night and sleeping all day, along with broken sleep throughout the night, did not help your health or mood. Going multiple days without sleep and then crashing are only a few basic models of sleep schedules that qualify as rest for a substance abuser. 

Chances are, you’d be surprised to see the difference sleeping for eight hours every night can make. It can help convert into a far better mood, higher energy levels, sharper mental alertness, better health, and more. But it all starts with getting plenty of rest.

Step 10: Set and Accomplish Goals

The most crucial step to take following substance addiction rehab is to figure out your life goals and set about following them. This will help put other positive things in motion. Now that you’re headed along a solid path towards your dreams like exercising, getting plenty of rest, and being good to loved ones will eventually fall into line. This an especially significant step to practice since you’ve probably not set any meaningful goals due to your substance abuse. Now, your new future is a blank slate, and you can decide who and what you want to be, accomplish in life, but you must make that decision and carry it out.

Get Help Today

If you or a loved one is rebuilding life after addiction and could use guidance to stay on track, we can help. Granite Mountain Behavioral Healthcare can help get you back on track and guide you in continuing your path to sobriety. Let’s face it; sobriety is a sprint, not a marathon. And with unexpected things in life like a global pandemic can disturb even the strongest of sober minds. This is why it is crucial to have a solid team to help you through the rehab journey. 

Do not hesitate any longer. Contact us today at Granite Mountain Behavioral Healthcare and allow our team to answer the questions you seek. Remember, this path does not have to be taken alone. We can help!

acupuncture for addiction treatment

Holistic Therapies: Using Acupuncture for Addiction Treatment

Holistic therapy is a treatment that uses all-natural means to promote healing or sobriety. One commonly used holistic treatment is acupuncture. Acupuncture may seem like an out of the ordinary way to treat addiction, but in reality, it is one of the oldest natural treatments known to man. Before choosing to utilize acupuncture in recovery, it is important to understand it’s history, what it is, and how it can benefit you. 

What are Holistic Therapies?

A growing trend in medicinal circles over the last several decades has been the incorporation of “alternative” or holistic approaches. These holistic approaches, such as acupuncture, can be used for any number of ailments-from body soreness to addiction and everything in between. Due to the popularity of drug-free offerings, more and more treatment centers in the US are offering these types of therapies

Holistic ideas refer to treatments or approaches that speak to the “whole person”. Ther focus is on both the mind and body and seeking healing for both/and. With trends pointing towards more “natural” options, these holistic approaches are becoming more popular and being offered regularly. Some of these holistic options include yoga, meditation, massage therapy, and acupuncture. Patients who adhere to these options can see direct benefits in the area they are hoping to improve, as well as great fringe benefits such as better fitness, better sleep, and lower cholesterol. 

What is Acupuncture?

Acupuncture is an ancient art and healing method that uses needles and manipulation of various pressure points on the body to treat various health concerns. Generally, acupuncture involves the insertion of long, thin needles under the skin at specific points to promote healing. Acupuncture is an ancient Chinese art and healing method that uses the manipulation of various points on the body to treat a variety of health concerns. The needles are sized perfectly and sterilized to make sure no infection occurs. In addition to traditional needle-based therapy, other treatments, such as massage or herbals, are also used.   

The theory behind acupuncture, historically, was that it keeps the “qi energy” of the body in balance. Today, acupuncture experts understand that acupuncture produces positive results by stimulating many different systems of the body, such as cardiovascular, endocrine, and immune. All acupuncture therapists must be fully licensed and trained in the nuances of their methods.  

While acupuncture may seem like a far-fetched way to approach recovery, many people these days are trying acupuncture as an all-natural way to step into healing. Because there are very few risks associated with acupuncture, patients from all walks of life can try it for ailments ranging from eating disorders to depression to various addictions

Uses for Acupuncture

Because it is relatively low-risk, acupuncture can be tried for basically any ailment. Patients report very little discomfort and positive results have been achieved from any different areas of health care. In general, acupuncture is most widely used for the following reasons:

  • Reducing the effects surrounding chemotherapy and other cancer treatments
  • Recovery from dental pain or procedures
  • General muscle soreness or body aches
  • Migraines or other headaches
  • Labor or menstrual pains
  • Various mental health disorders or addictions

The Risks of Acupuncture

The inherent risks of acupuncture treatment are extremely low if you have certified, competent therapists using safe needles.ome common post-treatment side effects of acupuncture include soreness, minor bruising, or brief bleeding. Still, not everyone is a good candidate for acupuncture and you may be at greater risk if you have any of the following issues:

  • Bleeding disorders or clotting issues- You may be at greater risk for increased bleeding if you have a bleeding disorder or are taking blood thinners.
  • Have a pacemaker- Because some acupuncture uses minor electrical pulses, you should not seek acupuncture treatment if you utilize a pacemaker
  • Are pregnant- Some forms of acupuncture can potentially induce labor and lead to premature delivery. 

What to Expect Before an Acupuncture Treatment

Every acupuncture therapist has a different and unique approach, with many blending Eastern and Western treatment philosophies. In order to determine the type of acupuncture treatment that will benefit you the most, your expert may ask detailed questions about your lifestyle, medical history, and behavior.

The initial pre-procedure intake can take up to 60 minutes. Follow-up appointments can take as little as 30 minutes. Commonly, treatment may be performed two to three times per week. However, the number and spacing of treatments will often depend on the condition being treated and its severity. Generally, most patients receive between six and ten total treatments. 

What Happens During an Acupuncture Treatment?

Pressure points that are treated during acupuncture are located in all areas of the body. Oddly enough, the areas treated may not be close to the area for which you are seeking relief. For example, someone seeking acupuncture treatment for addiction may be surprised to find needles placed far away from their head and neck. Your acupuncture therapist will discuss the areas that he or she will be treated prior to your appointment. You will be given a gown, sheet, or towel and asked to lie facedown on a comfortable,massage-style table. The actual treatment involves the following

  • Needle insertion-Specialized needles are placed below the skin, to varying depths, at pressure points across your body. Most patients do not even feel the needles. Generally, between five and 25 needles are used during treatment. IT is possible you will notice a mild ache at the point of insertion. 
  • Needle manipulation-Your therapist may lightly move or wiggle the needles once they are inserted. He or she may also apply other stimulants, such as heat or electrical stimulation. 
  • Needle removal- Generally, acupuncture needles are left in place for ten to twenty minutes before removal. Most patients report little to no discomfort after the needles have been removed. 

While many people report good results after acupuncture, its effectiveness still varies. Because acupuncture is being used to treat such a wide range of ailments, including addiction, results can vary wildly from person to person. One patient may find instant results from migraines or other physical ailments whereas another patient can see little to no change. But again, because there is so little risk involved, acupuncture is gaining wide popularity for a number of different issues. 

Can Acupuncture be Used on its Own?

There have been many good results with acupuncture for drug treatment, however, most rehabilitation facilities still tend to use it as a secondary method in conjunction with other treatments. It is better to consider acupuncture as a complementary or secondary treatment. While acupuncture does show promising signs of being an effective method of treating symptoms of drug addiction, it isn’t a good idea to use it as a singular treatment. Think of it as an alternative or supplemental treatment. For example, Acupuncture can be extremely effective in treating withdrawal symptoms, but it cannot medically detoxify someone struggling with addiction. 

Perhaps the most appealing result of acupuncture is the way it promotes pain and stress relief as well as increases relaxation. With addiction, stress and anxiety often go hand in hand and acupuncture can be effective at treating both in a holistic way. While those who suffer from severe symptoms can still benefit from anti-anxiety and depression medication, acupuncture can absolutely help. 

Acupuncture Treatment for Addiction

Beating drug addiction is an extremely difficult journey that requires a unique approach in order to succeed. However, acupuncture has emerged as a vital tool in the fight against opiate addiction and is being utilized ever-increasingly. Patients going through the detoxification process can greatly benefit from the calming effects of acupuncture. 

In addition to traditional mental health treatment approaches, such as counseling and group therapy, acupuncture can aid patients in overcoming cravings and help stave off the dangers of relapse. 

More and more therapists are turning to acupuncture to treat all types of ailments, including opiate addiction. Acupuncture treatments help patients to relax and draw focus away from cravings and destructive thoughts. 

While it is not entirely understood how acupuncture is so effective, research shows evidence that acupuncture raises endorphin levels, which act as the body’s natural painkillers. A patient receiving acupuncture treatments is truly balancing their “yin and yang” energies and helping their body achieve healthier state-mentally and physically. 

Acupuncture as an Alternative Treatment for Addiction

Although acupuncture is still widely perceived as an “alternative medicine”, many mainstream rehab facilities are adding it to their arsenal because of how effective it has proven in addiction treatment. In fact, a study done in 1989 showed that acupuncture, used in conjunction with other treatments such as psychotherapy, can be almost twice as effective at treating addiction as traditional therapy alone. 

Acupuncture has proven to be an extremely effective alternative to traditional methadone-based detoxification treatments. Because methadone itself is an addictive drug, it is highly preferable to use a more natural detox approach if at all possible. 

Avoiding the side-effects of methadone based detox is one main reason acupuncture use is skyrocketing. Addicts who used a methadone based treatment often find themselves becoming addicted to methadone instead. Therefore, acupuncture treatments are far more desirable than methadone treatments because there are no side effects or addictive qualities.  

To inquire if you are a candidate for acupuncture as part of your addiction treatment, contact us today!

cognitive dissonance

Cognitive Dissonance Treatment

Oftentimes, people have an explanation for their behavior and tend to rationalize it to make what they are doing seem more acceptable. This is especially true for people who suffer from addiction to drugs and alcohol

Despite the physical and psychological consequences of drinking and taking drugs, individuals who have this disease, view their addictive behaviors differently than those who don’t. 

When friends and family try to make a person with a substance use disorder (SUD) see that they need help, it is common for someone with an addiction to not be deliberately willful. This is because they are set on their own beliefs and justify them, even though they are misguided and careless.  

When a person always has a rational explanation for their irrational behavior, this is known in psychology as the cognitive dissonance theory. 

At Granite Mountain Behavioral Healthcare, our team aims to help our clients with addiction and mental illness recover. This is done by learning how to change their thought patterns and remove their dissonance through various methods of therapies such as cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). 

What is Cognitive Dissonance?

Cognitive means thinking, and dissonance means a lack of harmony between two things. When you put the two together, cognitive dissonance is when two thoughts, attitudes, beliefs, or behaviors are out of whack. This can make someone feel psychologically uncomfortable. 

The term cognitive dissonance was first coined in 1957 by Psychologist Leon Festinger. In his book titled, A Theory of Cognitive Dissonance, Festinger’s hypothesis was centered around the notion that people can develop a pre-existing condition in which they have to always check that they’re acting in accordance with what they believe. This is called internal consistency. When one’s beliefs become inconsistent or conflicting, this leads to disharmony and conflict, which is what most people try to avoid. 

In other words, as cognitive dissonance is described as a person who experiences feelings of internal discomfort, as a result of having two opposing cognitions in their mind at the same time, Festinger’s theory was correct. 

It was proven that individuals tend to look for some sort of stability and dependability with their attitudes, perceptions, and thoughts. But, oftentimes, their beliefs and actions/behaviors do not match up. People fail to realize that everyone has different feelings and beliefs, which will influence how they are going to behave. The saying actions speak louder than words rings true in this case.

When someone wholeheartedly believes in something, and it is challenged, that makes someone angry and they act on it without thinking. This causes distress and tension, affecting one’s ability to function normally. 

As established, dissonance is a lack of agreement between thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. People tend to act on their feelings/emotions, but do so impulsively. 

Therefore, to remove or resolve this dissonance all together, people have to do what is called, “explain something away.” This involves taking a number of steps and actions to overcome the discomfort by doing one of the things below including:

  • A person rationalizes their internal conflict by seeing it from a different perspective by adopting alternative ideas that could help to relieve or dispel negative thoughts and feelings. 
  • Someone changes their behaviors to better coincide with their thoughts.
  • Someone changes their thoughts to better coincide with their behaviors.  

The Relationship Between Cognitive Dissonance and Addiction

The theory of cognitive dissonance has serious implications and the role that it plays in those with addiction helps specialists understand the reasoning behind how an individual with a substance use disorder thinks vs someone without one. 

Addicted individuals crave drugs and alcohol, which distorts their ability to process information. When making the choice of whether to use or not, they believe in holding onto the ideas and comfort of engaging in things that they know are bad and irrational to a majority of other people. 

This is because the cognitive dissonance theory explains that people are willing to increase their own delusional ways of thinking to protect themselves from reality. It is similar to why a person drinks and takes drugs to cope and numb themselves from the discomfort or pain they are feeling.  

Again, an addict’s brain is different from someone who is not addicted to drugs and alcohol. For example, a person who tends to binge drink will justify their behavior by saying it is just a couple drink when in reality it is an excessive amount in a short period of time. 

Someone with addiction experiences cognitive dissonance often. They tend to modify their thought processes to support their cravings and addictive behavior, in order for them to feel or assure themselves that their choices or how they are acting is more favorable than it actually is. 

There is so much evidence that details how alcohol and drugs destroy lives, but addicted individuals will still justify the means, and view these substances as their form of support. People with cognitive dissonance blame their addiction issues and the reason why they drink excessively is that they have problems in their lives. Examples of how cognitive dissonance affects a person with substance abuse include the following: 

  • They believe that people who do not engage in the use of drugs and alcohol are boring and lack character. 
  • The reason for abusing substances is because they believe it is a sign of artistic intelligence.
  •  People who become sober are deprived of life and can never experience happiness. 
  • The only comfort for one’s problems is alcohol and drugs. 

A big component of cognitive dissonance and addiction is denial. People who are addicted to substances tend to deny that they have a problem, to begin with. Those with this distorted way of thinking may not even realize that they have a problem, or if they do, they ignore it. They believe that no amount of help is needed, there is no help available, or that treatment can’t help them and recovery is unattainable. 

People with addiction tend to feel alone, and the one thing that makes them feel whole is to drink and take drugs. Little do they know, overdose, coma, seizures, and death occur before finally deciding to get help. 

However, there are fortunate individuals who see how their substance abuse is causing not only destruction in their lives but also with those who love them. They hold onto the belief that they will see better days and that recovery is needed to change their life.

Factors of Cognitive Dissonance 

In today’s world, people do things or have beliefs and opinions that sometimes leave us questioning humanity. Maybe they do not make much sense to you or other people, but everyone is different. 

While it is true that people do crazy and illogical things, behaviors are linked and related to what we are influenced by biologically, environmentally, physically, psychologically, and socially. There are major factors that contribute to the cause of addiction and cognitive dissonance. These include: 

 

  • Decision-Making: Cognitive dissonance completely changes an individual’s ability to make decisions, especially ones with addiction. 
  • Forced Compliance Behavior: When a person is forced to do something that they didn’t want to do, and their thoughts provoke them to do it anyway. 
  • Effort: If we put a lot of effort into something and it goes poorly, people tend to justify it that they did the best they could. This is called effort-justification. 

 

There is no doubt that cognitive dissonance can have a powerful influence on our behaviors and actions. 

How Addiction Affects Decision-Making 

People want to believe that they or others make good choices. Although, when something they once believed turns out too good to be true, it conflicts with their pre-existing beliefs about their decision-making abilities. 

This theory of cognitive dissonance plays a major role especially for those who suffer from substance abuse. Addiction is a disease that already changes the chemistry of the brain and its ability to function normally. The regions that allow us to think and make decisions effectively have been damaged. 

For someone with addiction issues, when dissonance comes into play, it greatly compromises their ability to make rational decisions. One could argue that drinking and taking drugs is ultimately someone’s choice. 

However, while that may be true, evidence-based scientific research has shown that this disease plays mind games, controlling all aspects of a person’s life, mentally, physically, and socially. 

In other words, cognitive dissonance works in tandem with addiction. It completely changes a person’s moral compass, which is why the choice they make to engage in these addictive behaviors is stronger than just willpower. 

The neurotransmitters within the brain have been modified to now accommodate drugs and alcohol, essentially brainwashing people into believing that these substances are “good” for them. Without professional help, the cycle of addiction will continue.  

Cognitive Dissonance Treatment 

When there are conflicts between cognitions (thoughts, beliefs, opinions), people will take steps to reduce the dissonance and feelings of discomfort. This is what addiction specialists at Granite Mountain specialize in.

Have you ever felt a sense of tension in your mind, but you weren’t sure why or what was causing it? This psychological phenomenon of cognitive dissonance is hard to detect, but for those with addiction, it is important to recognize. This can help be able to detect any underlying mental illness that can be a major contributor to someone’s addictive behavior. Co-occurring disorders (addiction and substance disorder coinciding) can be managed with dual diagnosis treatment.

Cognitive dissonance in a  way is mental illness within itself, and without treatment, the chances of relapse are high, and most importantly, it exacerbates an individual’s condition and hinders their chances of a successful recovery. 

If you or a loved one is suffering from cognitive dissonance and addiction and would like to learn more about treatment options, contact us today! We will help you recover and get your life back!

References 

https://www.verywellmind.com/what-is-cognitive-dissonance-2795012

https://www.simplypsychology.org/cognitive-dissonance.html

self-esteem

How to Build and Improve Your Self-Esteem During Addiction Recovery

The symbiotic relationship between drug and alcohol addiction and self-esteem is complex and oftentimes hard to understand. While they do go hand-in-hand, many questions need to be answered to fully comprehend the psychology behind self-worth and addictive behaviors. 

The main one being poor self-image, a problem that needs to be solved in conjunction with addressing one’s addiction issues, or will it naturally work itself out when the addictive behaviors don’t occur anymore? 

The answer to this question varies from person to person. There is not a one-size-fits-all approach. Each person’s circumstances or struggles with addiction are different. However, what isn’t contradictory is that professional treatment at a rehab facility is necessary to recover. Treatment can break the treacherous cycle of addiction and improve your low self-esteem.

The addiction specialists and multidisciplinary team at Granite Mountain Behavioral Healthcare in Prescott Valley, AZ, can help break this cycle of addiction, thus, improving one’s self-esteem. 

The Relationship Between Self-Esteem and Addiction

While these are various common reasons and risk factors of addiction, numerous evidence-based research studies have proven that the root cause of addiction is the result of low self-esteem. 

Not effectively addressing the major role that self-esteem plays in all aspects of life, including addiction, unfortunately, and all too commonly, leads to various complications health-wise, socially, mentally, and physically. 

Missed signs of addiction and any sort of psychological distress can also deter someone from receiving the professional help that they need, hinder their addiction recovery process, and also cause individuals to potentially relapse. So, why is self-esteem such an important component of addiction recovery? 

What is Self-Esteem? 

What exactly is self-esteem, where does it arise from, and why is it so influential and important in our lives? 

In the world of psychology, self-esteem is defined as a person’s overall self-worth or personal value. In other words, it is how much you value, respect, like, and appreciate yourself. Use the power of positive psychology if you will. 

Importance of Self-Esteem

Self-esteem is often viewed as a personality trait, which encompasses a variety of beliefs, including appearance, emotions, and behaviors. It is extremely influential and important because it plays a significant role in all aspects of a person’s life, including mental health, relationships, success, failures, and motivation. 

There are both healthy and low levels of self-esteem, which can fluctuate from time-to-time depending on your genetics, age, environment, people around you, attitude, etc. However, it is often our experiences that form the basis of our overall self-esteem, positively and negatively. Although, it is important to note that there needs to be a balance between too little and too much self-worth a person can have. 

Signs of Good Self-Esteem

If you exhibit the following signs and behaviors, you most likely have good self-esteem. 

  • Having confidence, but knowing the difference between that and being arrogant
  • Being able to accept who you are
  • Can take constructive criticism and feedback
  • Has the ability to say no
  • Has a positive outlook on things, and is always able to do so even when times are hard 
  • Ability to see things from various perspectives, including strengths and weaknesses
  • Expressing your needs, wants, and opinions
  • Does not seek approval from others
  • Not afraid of failure or setbacks 
  • Accepts imperfection

Confidence in one’s value as a human being is something that doesn’t come easy for everyone, which makes it a beneficial psychological resource. Whenever someone exudes confidence, it commands attention and is noticeable.

Signs of Low Self-Esteem

If you exhibit the following signs and behaviors, you may be experiencing low self-esteem. 

  • Negative outlook and defeatist attitude
  • Lack of confidence
  • Inability to express your wants and needs
  • Focus on weaknesses and negativity
  • Not being able to see things from other perspectives
  • Trouble accepting criticism or feedback 
  • The belief that others are better than you
  • Comparing yourself to others
  • Putting yourself down
  • Intense fear of failure

Self-esteem is a characteristic that inevitably changes over time, and therefore, success or setbacks both personally and professionally can negatively impact a person. 

How Low Self-Esteem Causes Addiction 

The effects of low self-esteem can be detrimental, especially when suffering from addiction. Becoming addicted to drugs and alcohol is a consequence of a choice and compulsive addictive behavior. 

For people who have developed low self-esteem over time due to various reasons, commonly experience symptoms of anxiety or depression, and as a result, they turn to drugs and alcohol to mask their pain and insecurities. Low self-esteem results in self-medicating.

In other words, those with low self-esteem turn to drugs and alcohol to numb pain and escape from reality. These substances are seen as a way to escape. 

What Happens to Self-Esteem When Using?

For people with low self-esteem, drinking, and taking drugs allows these individuals to feel like they appear more confident than they really are. 

Again, the whole reason why people engage in these addictive behaviors in the first place is that they believe that these substances make their problems or feelings disappear, despite the consequences. Easy accessibility of drugs and alcohol also is a major contributing factor. 

However, doing so compulsively, actually makes matters worse, and often leads to dependency and addiction. What some people fail to realize at the time is that these euphoric feelings from the drugs and alcohol are temporary and short-term. 

These substances turn out to not be a permanent solution for their pain and suffering, but rather, a temporary release. Along with health consequences, mentally physically, and socially, addiction resulting from substance abuse, ends up severely affecting a person’s self-esteem, causing their self-confidence to dissipate quickly.    

Eventually, individuals suffering from addiction are incapable of overcoming these challenges that caused them to turn to drink and take drugs in the first place. As their substance use disorder worsens, the lower their self-esteem becomes. 

Simply, the more one uses, the worse they end up feeling about themselves. What was once just a low self-confidence issue has now spiraled in addiction, which has taken control of all aspects of one’s life. 

This cycle of addiction and low self-esteem is only able to be taken hold of with help from medical professionals and addiction specialists. 

Addiction Risk Factors

Oftentimes, people wonder what is it that makes people want to make that choice to use and abuse drugs and alcohol in the first place? The answer to this can be complex, as addictive behaviors vary from person to person, but, mainly because various factors increase the likelihood of developing an addiction. 

The common reasons why people turn to the use of substances include but are not limited to:

  • It’s a choice that results in consequences 
  • Family history of substance abuse (Genetics) 
  • Co-occurring mental illness
  • Coping mechanism (Self-Medication)
  • Environmental factors and peer pressure

Addiction is a chronic disease that severely affects the brain and body. While this is true, neurological functions are not the sole cause of substance use disorders (SUD). Many different components play a role in the cause of addiction. 

In other words, drug and alcohol addiction is not just the result of one factor in a user’s life. Instead, it is a combination of them that exposes people to this destructive path. There are three main areas of risk factors that contribute to dependency and addiction. They are as follows: 

Biological Predispositions

Drug and alcohol addiction is 50 percent attributed to genetics. Research has shown that children who are the product of addicts are approximately eight times more likely to become ones themselves. 

Not everyone who has a family history of substance abuse will be an addict, but the probability and susceptibility of becoming addicted are high. Males are more likely to become addicted to drugs and alcohol than women.  

Environmental Factors and Influences

The environment that you are in has a major effect and influence on people’s behaviors. Being at home or school is very influential on the possible development of substance use disorders. 

As mentioned before, having a family history of drug use and alcoholism increases the chances of someone else having the same genetic predisposition for addiction. 

At school and work, peer pressure and fitting in is a huge risk factor for addiction, as well as stress. Feelings of stress and anxiety in these environments are normal but often result in the gravitation towards substances, as people believe it will help them cope or forget what they are feeling at the time. However, it just exacerbates the situation, resulting in a host of health problems, physically, mentally, and socially.  

Drug Choice and Methods of Use

The likelihood of addiction depends on the drug or alcoholic beverage of choice. Especially with drugs, the potency of certain drugs leads to dependency and addiction. 

With one use of a drug, that is usually all it takes, which commonly leads to polysubstance abuse, meaning the use of one or more substances. The way a drug is taken, the meaning if it was snorted, injected, or in pill form. Drugs that are smoked or injected have a much faster euphoric or high effect on the body. 

As a user takes a drug or drinks more and more, the body becomes tolerant and dependent on the substance, which means that with each time of use, a higher dosage will be required to keep feeling the same drunk or high effect. Thus, tolerance and dependence lead to addiction. 

However, one answer that many researchers have agreed upon is low self-esteem. Self-esteem is defined as confidence in one’s own abilities. This type of self-respect plays a crucial role in the likelihood that a person will abuse drugs, which in turn means that a drug abuse treatment program works to combat and improve the factors that influence low self-esteem.

Mental Health and Addiction

People who don’t suffer from mental conditions associated with self-esteem, such as anxiety and depression, don’t fully understand why people turn to self-medicating with drugs and alcohol as a means to cope instead of seeking treatment for their symptoms. 

Mental illness is a major risk factor for substance abuse, and often these conditions occur simultaneously. This is defined as a dual diagnosis or co-occurring disorders. Someone with mental health issues commonly develops a substance use disorder. 

Unfortunately, but all too often, the underlying mental illness is left undiagnosed and untreated. Thus, conditions worsen, along with a person’s self-esteem.

A major reason that people also don’t receive the proper help that they need is because of mental stigma. Feeling of shame, guilt, and embarrassment often take over, making a person with addiction reluctant to admit to themselves, friends, and family that they need help, or they are in denial that they need help in the first place. 

This avoidance to seek help not only worsens mental health and addiction but, most importantly, an individual’s self-worth. People with low self-esteem feel that they aren’t worth receiving help or that there is no one out there to help them when in reality, there is. 

Importance of Self-Esteem During Addiction Recovery

The drugs and alcohol are no longer in your system as you went through the process of detoxification. Addressing one’s lack of self-esteem is now a priority.

For those in addiction recovery, healthy self-esteem becomes a powerful tool and resource to turn to, which not only helps people stay on the road to long-term recovery, but also prevent relapse.

Think of it in this logical way: When you are feeling good about yourself and value what you have to offer, you are more likely to stay motivated and on a successful path to recovery and avoid entering into the cycle of addiction. 

In the early stages of recovery, people are very emotional and at a very low point with poor self-esteem. That is why building up your self-worth during this crucial time can make a big difference in your recovery journey, increasing the chances of a successful outcome and long-term sobriety.

Improving Self-Esteem Through Addiction Treatment

The good news is that help for addiction, and low self-esteem is available! Steps to rebuilding your self-esteem despite your addiction are possible with the right treatment plan and resources. 

There are three major causes of poor self-esteem in recovery, immorality, instability, and insignificance. Knowing what causes these negative feelings makes it easier for us to build up you or your loved one’s self-esteem through methods of therapy and counseling. 

Whether you are contemplating receiving help or already on the road to recovery from addiction, here are three tips on how to rebuild, boost, and improve your self-esteem during addiction recovery. 

  1. Think positively: I know it is easy for someone to say, but the power of positive thinking does make all the difference in all aspects of life. By using psychological techniques of reframing, meaning flipping a situation to be positive rather than negative, it helps to see things from a different perspective, so that you can handle it effectively. In addiction recovery, maintaining a positive attitude will help motivate you and others to not give up.  
  2. Self-forgiveness: Take responsibility for your actions, but don’t beat yourself up. Think about how far you have come and allowed yourself to be forgiven. This way, you will be able to move forward and focus on recovery. 
  3. Affirmations: Give yourself daily affirmations such as I am receiving the help that I need and doing well, I am a warrior, I am beautiful. Also, give other people a compliment and smile, it will make you and others around you feel positive energy, and that you are all in this together. 

Granite Mountain Can Help You Recover 

To truly understand the connection between low self-esteem and substance abuse, one needs to first understand that low self-esteem is a result of many conditions, including addiction and mental illness. 

Having low self-esteem during addiction recovery is very common in the beginning, but there are methods of treatment to help treat substance abuse and mental illness. With time, your self-esteem, confidence, and worth will all return, as the cycle of addiction will no longer be in your path. 

To learn more about how we can help individuals combating addiction rebuild their self-esteem and prevent relapse, contact us at Granite Mountain today!

References

https://www.verywellmind.com/what-is-self-esteem-2795868

https://www.lifehack.org/565816/low-self-esteem

https://www.thecabinchiangmai.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Risk-Factors-for-Drug-Addiction.pdf

https://www.verywellmind.com/five-ways-to-build-self-esteem-22380

high-functioning depression

High-Functioning Depression and Addiction: Recognizing the Signs

When someone has a mental illness such as depression and suffers from addiction simultaneously, this is called dual diagnosis or a co-occurring disorder. Those with dual diagnoses commonly resort to using drugs and alcohol to cope and end up developing a dependency, eventually leading to addiction. This is especially true for people with high- functioning depression. 

Vice versa, those with an addiction to drugs and alcohol commonly suffer from some sort of mental illness. As a result, treatment and recovery at a rehab facility such as Granite Mountain Behavioral Healthcare in Prescott Valley, Arizona is the best option for living a high-quality life and maintaining sobriety. 

Our addiction specialists have created this guide to help you or a loved one effectively recognize the signs of high-functioning depression, and erase the stigma surrounding mental health. Know that help is available before it is too late.  

What is High-Functioning Depression 

If you looked up the term high-functioning depression in the DSM-5, the diagnostic manual used by psychologists and other mental health professionals to diagnose their patients, you wouldn’t find it under that name. This is because the official name for high-functioning depression is persistent depressive disorder (PDD). 

Also known as Dysthymia, PDD is more common than people think, as there are more than 3 million cases annually in the United States. Diagnosed more in women than men, dysthymia is defined as a chronic, high-functioning form of depression, meaning it is continuous and lasts long-term. This type of depression is a lot harder to spot. While people may think of depression as the common term, it is the word “persistent” that is the focus keyphrase. 

Further evidence-based research conducted by the American Psychological Association (APA) shows, that approximately 14.8 million American adults or about 6.7 percent of people aged 18 and older in the United States suffer from a depressive disorder in a given year. 

Since dysthymia is classified as chronic, and not acute, suffers from this mental disorder may experience symptoms for many years before actually being properly diagnosed. 

This further proves the point, that individuals suffering from high-functioning depression, who are often good at suppressing their problems often believe that the “depression” or sadness they are feeling is just part of who they are. Thus, missing the realization that what they are actually experiencing may be more severe than they originally let on. 

This also explains why depression sufferers seem to hesitate in discussing with doctors, family, or friends about how they feel, as they say, they feel “fine.” Although, it is common for people with mental illness or substance abuse issues to feel embarrassed to come forward and admit they may have a real problem, and most importantly, that they need help. 

However, it is crucial to understand all the ins-and-outs of both high-functioning depression and addiction, in order to effectively recognize the signs, symptoms, and risk factors of these co-occurring disorders. 

What Makes Someone “High Functioning?”

As mentioned before, people who are classified as “high functioning” often do anything they can to give the impression that they have got it all together, that their lives are going very well and everything is normal. While this may be true and convincing, deep down, sufferers of depression are unwell, and constantly fighting to keep it together and survive each day at a time.

People with high-functioning depression tend to be happy, successful, intelligent, friendly, outgoing, and disciplined people. While this may be true and convincing, deep down, sufferers of this mental illness are not fine, and constantly fighting to keep it together and survive each day at a time.

Living With Persistent Depressive Disorder 

Have you ever known a person who has it all; a loving family, a great job, and a decent social life? While in-person or on social media it may look like their life may be happy and perfect, the answer is nothing is perfect or always what it seems. 

In fact, scientific studies have shown that the more someone appears to have it all together, it is more likely that they are going through something, but trying their best to hide it. The saying, “Be nice, because everyone is fighting a battle you know nothing about,” never rings truer. This scenario paints a picture of someone suffering from persistent depressive disorder. 

Living with this type of depression is difficult, and those who do are internally plagued by negativity, and a dialogue of self-doubt. This makes people feel insecure, incompetent, and unworthy. People with this type of depression can live their daily lives, but it truly enjoying every day comes with constant challenges. 

In other words, as everyone is different, a typical good day for a person with high-functioning depression looks like an individual who doesn’t have depression. This type of depression causes bad days to outweigh the good, unfortunately. While it may take only an hour or two for other people to focus and complete their tasks, those with severe depression may have an extremely hard time focusing.

Co-occurring Conditions: High-Functioning Depression and  Addiction

High functioning depression and addiction go hand-in-hand, which is why it is extremely important to know the signs of both disorders so you or a loved one can get the necessary help. People who suffer from depression are twice as likely to suffer from addiction and are usually able to function well. Although, PPD and addiction are difficult to manage without professional help. 

At least three-quarters of patients with dysthymia also have a chronic physical illness or another psychiatric disorder, such as drug addiction, or alcoholism. It is very common for people with PDD to have an addiction to drugs and alcohol. High-functioning depression impacts people’s lives in various ways. As a result, it causes sufferers to rely heavily on coping mechanisms, commonly drinking alcohol or using drugs. 

Coping With Depression: Substance Abuse  

Approximately 50 percent of people with a substance use disorder, such as alcoholism or drug addiction, are considered high-functioning. This number speaks volumes. While these people are considered to have PDD, behind closed doors, oftentimes, because they are depressed, they turn to the use of drugs and alcohol as a means to try and self-medicate and cope with their symptoms. 

Vice Versa, some people are addicted to drugs and alcohol first, and then develop an onset of depression symptoms later on because of damage to the brain caused by long-term substance abuse. 

No, I Can’t Just “Get Over It”- Depression vs Clinical Depression

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), while anxiety disorders are the most common mental illnesses in the United States, the prevalence of depression is not far behind, as more than 300 million people worldwide suffering from the disorder. 

Defined as a mood disorder, depression is a mental illness known to cause a persistent feeling of sadness and loss of interest. Depression has many faces and a variety of different kinds. The most common types include:

  • Seasonal Depression: 
  • Major Depressive Disorder 
  • Postpartum Depression
  • Situational Depression
  • Atypical Depression 
  • Psychotic Depression

The most popular type of depression affecting people today is major depressive disorder commonly known as clinical depression. It is extremely important to note, that there is a key difference between depression and clinical depression. 

Depression

Someone who is not diagnosed with a certain type of depression, but is “depressed,” experience normal bouts of sadness that arise from certain situations that occur. This is called Subsyndromal symptomatic depression (SSD), meaning that a person is depressed, but their symptoms don’t meet the criteria for a diagnosis of a major depressive episode. 

Clinical Depression

When you are suffering from high functioning depression the things that used to bring you joy often become things that you want to avoid. Clinical depression, however, is severe, where an individual is depressed for a couple of weeks or more, and it affects their ability to function, such as think, feel, sleep, work, eat, and handle daily tasks. The National Institute of Mental Health (NAMI) states that in order to be diagnosed with some sort of depression, the symptoms must be present for at least two weeks

Signs and Symptoms of High-Functioning Depression

If you or a loved one has been experiencing the following symptoms, either most days or every day for at least two weeks or more, this may be a sign that you are suffering from depression. NAMI states that the most common signs and symptoms of depression include the following: 

  • A feeling of hopelessness or negativity
  • Persistent sadness, anxiousness, emptiness
  • Tiredness
  • Irritability
  • Isolation
  • Thoughts of death or suicide, or attempt to commit suicide
  • Loss of interest in favorite hobbies and activities
  • Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, or helplessness
  • Lack of energy and focus
  • Fatigue and restlessness
  • Difficulty remembering things
  • Indecisiveness
  • Difficulty sleeping (Insomnia) and waking up in the morning
  • Extreme changes in your appetite and weight

Not everyone who is depressed experiences all of these symptoms mentioned above. Everyone and their cases of depression are different, and therefore, their symptoms and treatment for the illness will vary. For example, some people may experience a few symptoms, while others will experience many. An individual’s symptoms may also depend on the stage of depression that they have. 

Diagnosing High-Functioning Depression: An Invisible Disease 

Truth is, for people living with high functioning depression, it is often hard to tell because these are the types of individuals who are high achievers, perfectionists, and who are experts at making you think everything is all right even when it is not. 

The point is, you would never know that the person right in front of you is suffering from depression because they appear to be functioning normally. 

In order to be diagnosed with depression, an individual must have a severe inability to function in life. This is why so many with PDD go undiagnosed. They appear to be functioning, but once they finish work or any other task, they immediately head home to be in isolation. Since functioning inabilities are not as bad for a person with PDD as they are for someone with major depression, this behavior can last for a very long time.

It’s even possible for someone with PDD to develop more severe symptoms that result in episodes of major depression when their symptoms are left untreated. This is why it’s important to seek treatment if you suspect that you or someone in your life may be suffering.

Just like any type of dual diagnosis, high functioning depression and addiction often go unnoticed and undiagnosed. Essentially, it is deemed an invisible disease. Navigating through life without getting help for a mental illness is not only dangerous, but it causes complications such as the likelihood of relapse and increases the risk of overdose and suicide. 

How to Treat High-Functioning Depression and Addiction

High-functioning depression and addiction can be effectively treated in a safe environment using methods of detoxification, behavioral therapy, medication therapy, and other evidence-based therapies for these disorders. Detox helps with a physical dependency on drugs and alcohol, while behavioral therapy addresses the root of the problem and helps identify the reasoning behind why you are depressed to help you overcome it. 

Those who need help and treatment for co-occurring disorders such as PDD and addiction can receive it in an inpatient rehab facility, monitored by trained addiction specialists. Treatment programs that last a minimum of three months (90 days) are recommended for patients with a dual diagnosis. 

Ending the Stigma Surrounding Mental Health

While the stigma surrounding mental health is starting to improve, there is still a lot of work to do, and some dangerous myths to debunk. Depression is severe and persistent, and not something someone can just get over or shut off automatically. 

Granite Mountain is Here to Help

If you or someone you may know is suffering from signs of high-functioning depression and addiction, the addiction specialists at Granite Mountain Behavioral Healthcare are here to help you recover and maintain sobriety. Contact us today at (877) 389-0412. 

References

https://www.psycom.net/high-functioning-depression/

https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/depression/index.shtml

https://www.verywellmind.com/depression-statistics-everyone-should-know-4159056

https://bhatiapsychology.com/what-is-high-functioning-depression/

https://www.dailyhealthcures.com/general-health/high-functioning-depression/

https://www.who.int/en/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/depression

https://www.healthline.com/health/depression/this-is-what-high-functioning-depression-looks-like#1

https://explorable.com/e/common-types-of-depression

Signs of Adderall Abuse

Signs of Adderall Abuse: Who is Abusing it The Most?

With any drug, most people are aware that there are often side effects associated with taking it. For those who take Adderall, prescribed or not, the reward is oftentimes more important than the consequences. Individuals who use this drug regularly may begin to show signs of Adderall abuse.

Are you or someone you know addicted to Adderall and don’t know where or who to turn to for help? At Granite Mountain Behavioral Healthcare, our drug addiction specialists help people with drug addiction get back on the road to sobriety. 

One of America’s Favorite Drugs of Choice

Many students and former students would most likely say that studying late into the night and cramming for exams was just a normal part of being in high school and college. But, can you think of how many countless stories that you have heard about someone who used Adderall in some capacity when they were in school? 

While it is the norm, especially more so in college to pull an all-nighter, people are able to keep up with their crazy academic workloads, because they resort to taking Adderall, also known as the “Study” or “Get ahead” drug. 

Adderall does seem to keep people laser-focused. But, what is crazy, is not why people take it or how it works. Instead, the number of people who use it, prescribed or often unsubscribed, is alarming. Surprisingly, this medication is so easy to get. It is true to say that Adderall has become the foundation of most modern American college campuses today. 

Think about it for a second. A magic drug that makes people feel like a rock star at school or work; hyperalert and able to get anything done. I know, it sounds like Charlie finding the golden ticket in Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory. But, truth is, while Adderall is approved by the FDA and only available through a prescription from a licensed psychiatrist, it is one of the drugs most frequently abused and used illegally. 

What is Adderall? 

Adderall is a medication classified as a stimulant, made up of amphetamine and dextroamphetamine. It is commonly used to treat people diagnosed with a behavioral disorder, such as Attention Deficit Disorder/Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADD/ADHD), and sleep disorders, such as Narcolepsy. For individuals with these disorders, the drug helps one’s ability to focus, pay attention, and control behavior. Other symptoms that result from taking Adderall include suppressed appetite and weight loss. 

Only available by prescription, Adderall is a tablet that is commonly ingested orally. Available in various dosages, ranging from 5mg to 30 mg, depending on the person and the severity of their symptoms. According to the National Institute of Health (NIH), doctors usually start patients with a lower dose and gradually increase it as needed. 

While Adderall is one of the most well-known medications used to treat hyperactivity, there are two versions, Adderall and Adderall XR. Both Adderall and Adderall XR work by increasing these neurotransmitters in the brain that are responsible for regulating attention and focus. While both types have the same ingredients, they absorb in the body differently at different speeds, along with the strength and dosage. 

Adderall and Adderall XR

Adderall tablets are usually taken first thing when someone wakes up in the morning, so it can absorb, as subsequent doses must be taken four to six hours apart. More than one Adderall pill can be taken as instructed. 

Adderall XR is a secondary form of Adderall, but with an extended-release. This means, that the capsule dissolves slowly, and the ingredients are released into the body throughout the day, which makes the drug last for a long period of time. Adderall XR is only taken once a day.

So, the question is, how does someone realize that they are abusing a drug, such as Adderall?

Adderall Usage and Abuse: High School and College Students

This may be a hard pill to swallow, but the most common group of Adderall abusers is the American youth, ranging from high school to college students. A study published in The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry found an increase in the non-medical usage of Adderall, resulting in an increased number of ER visits, but no increase in prescriptions for the drug.

This evidence further indicates that Adderall abuse is on the rise, especially on college campuses, being the second-most common drug abused, besides marijuana. 60 percent of people ages 18-25 use the drug without a prescription.

Students often see using Adderall as a win-win situation. After all, what’s not to like about being able to focus for long periods of time for a few dollars or for free even? Those who sell or share Adderall justify it with the idea that “sharing is caring.” 

Adderall is now so prevalent on college campuses that students act like it is water because they perceive the drug as a harmless and relatively benign substance. As the pressures of school increase, people found it necessary to increase their dosage, makes sense right? 

However, again, people don’t understand or are aware of the science behind what these drugs can do to one’s brain and body. The more a person takes Adderall, the more their body will become used to it. While the drug has its benefits, it still has addictive properties, and those who don’t necessarily need it can become addicted if not careful. 

The more someone takes Adderall, the body becomes dependent on it, which often leads to the start of abuse and addiction. This is because, just like prescription opioids, Adderall is known for its high potential for tolerance, which is what leads to addiction, or the progression to other stronger substances. The side effects of Adderall withdrawals can be debilitating, which can make it difficult for people to quit using.

Adderall Abuse and Addiction

One Adderall pill was enough to convince you that the drug was amazing. Once people who are especially not diagnosed with ADHD continue to abuse Adderall, they experience what is called “The Adderall High.” The drug produces euphoria and gives people energy. But it is much more than that. It kind of makes people feel like they can do anything, feel almost superhuman. This is where the danger comes into play. 

When people are on Adderall and then come off the drug, they will often start to seem depressed and lethargic. They may not be interested in doing anything, and they tend to be detached from the people and activities they once enjoyed doing. 

There are many signs of Adderall abuse. Also, there are also common warning signs that someone is addicted to Adderall, not just using it recreationally. Remember that addiction can include a psychological or physiological dependence on the drug.

The problem comes in when people who use Adderall keep taking the drug. His or her body may become dependent on it, eventually. As a result, the individual’s body slowly stops working properly. This is due to substance dependency and tolerance. 

Identifying Some Signs of Adderall Abuse

Adderall abuse occurs in several ways. Some of the common signs that someone is abusing Adderall include:

  • The need to take bigger and bigger doses to feel an effect
  • Continuing to use Adderall despite negative effects and consequence
  • Using a higher dose of the substance than prescribed. 
  • Taking the medicine through a non-approved method like snorting.
  • Taking the drug for reasons other than medical need, such as to stay awake for long periods of time.
  • Using the medication more frequently than prescribed.
  • Taking someone else’s medication.
  • Spending excessive amounts of money on Adderall and purchasing it from an illicit source for recreational use.

Eventually, with continued use of Adderall, people will start to experience withdrawal symptoms if they don’t take the drug, and ongoing use of Adderall can lead to chemical imbalances in the brain. The brain becomes so used to the Adderall over time, that every time it is taken, what once worked in the beginning, no longer works or has the same effect. 

Therefore, people continue to increase the amount they take, to feel the same “high” effect they once used to feel from a lower dosage. Before they know it, they are addicted and need help to end this vicious cycle of Adderall abuse. 

How Does Adderall Affect the Brain and Body? 

Adderall, a stimulant, which works by increasing the levels of neurotransmitters known as dopamine and norepinephrine within the central nervous system (CNS), consisting of the brain and spinal cord. 

Norepinephrine is responsible for producing many effects within the body. It’s mainly associated with releasing adrenaline. This provokes the “fight or flight” response when the perceived danger. Norepinephrine affects how the brain responds to events, particularly the speed to which it reacts to outside stimuli.

Dopamine is the body’s “feel-good” chemical. This is because it plays a major role in the motivational component of reward-motivated behavior. 

When someone takes Adderall, norepinephrine speeds up the CNS. This keeps the neurotransmitter in the synapses longer. In turn, it triggers alertness, clarity, increasing focus, and decreasing appetite. Dopamine is the reward neurochemical. It’s why someone who uses Adderall may experience feelings of happiness or euphoria. While euphoria from dopamine is natural and warranted, drugs like Adderall produce abnormal amounts of it. This leaves people who need the drug or want it coming back for more.  

When someone has ADHD, taking Adderall helps them be calm, focus, concentrate, think things through, and control their behavior. Sometimes, people who don’t actually have ADHD or haven’t been properly diagnosed still take Adderall. This is due to the fact that they see it as helpful. While it is illegal for individuals with a prescription to sell drugs to others, that doesn’t stop some from profiting off their prescription. 

However, the brain sees it differently. For some, the drug can have the opposite effect. In other words, in people with ADHD, the drug, used in conjunction with appropriate behavioral and psychotherapeutic interventions, brings their level of stimulation down to a level where they’re better able to function. In healthy people, the drug has the opposite effect. It over-stimulates the brain, causing long-term adverse symptoms and withdrawal.

Common Symptoms of Adderall Withdrawal 

  • Weakness or numbness in extremities
  • Lack of energy
  • Irritability or anger
  • Insomnia
  • Constipation
  • Headaches
  • Chest pain
  • Shortness of breath
  • Low libido
  • Vision problems
  • Peeling or blistering skin
  • Mental problems such as mania, paranoia or seizures

Side effects are a sign of what is occurring within the brain and the body. Our bodies are connected to our minds. So, whenever something happens in the brain, it sends a signal to the body for a reaction. Adderall creates a lot of activity in the brain. This can be problematic for people who have a mental disorder such as anxiety. Taking this drug can worsen one’s mental health disorder symptoms. Still, that doesn’t stop people from becoming addicted

Thankfully, there is help for those who are suffering from substance abuse. Individuals who are dealing with Adderall dependence can find hope. Through treatment and therapy, people can become free from addiction.

Let Granite Mountain Behavioral Healthcare Help

Granite Mountain Behavioral Healthcare offers drug addiction treatment to help those who are dependent on Adderall get clean and maintain sobriety. The biggest step you can make toward recovering from addiction is picking up the phone and asking for help. 

Our goal is to provide compassion and support during your decision-making process for seeking treatment. We are here for you every step of the way. Contact us today at (877) 389-0412. 

References

Group Therapy for Heroin Detox

What to Expect Going Through Heroin Detox in Yavapai County, AZ

What Is Heroin?

Heroin a derivative of the opium poppy flower, which is native to Asia, Mexico, and South America. This drug is extremely addictive and is illegal in the US. It has the appearance of white or brown powder, or more the popular black tar. Some of its names are smack, horse, junk, and brown sugar.

How Addictive is Heroin?

It doesn’t matter how you use it, once it is in your system, heroin hits the brain rapidly. It is very easy to develop an addiction to heroin. Even after just one use.

Heroin can be smoked or snorted, although most heroin users use a needle to inject it directly in the vein to get the fastest high. It is also the most dangerous way to take it. Injections cause the risk of overdosing to increase dramatically, and the risk of infection from dirty needles is very high.

How Does Heroin Effect You?

Directly after a hit of heroin, the brain is flooded with endorphins, it is a rush of euphoria. After several hours, you’ll experience a slowing sensation like the world is moving slow. This can cause a user to think slower and sometimes even walk slower. Some heroin users express that they feel like they are in a dream.

Here is a study in Illinois concerning suburban users, some defined the use of heroin gave them a feeling of being wrapped in a warm blanket and worries were gone.

This potentially lethal drug sometimes causes vomiting or nausea. It can also create an urge to scratch and itch. Heroin in the system changes your brain’s chemistry and can even block pain signals or slow both breathing and heart rate. Overdosing will cause you to stop breathing and lastly die.

Heroin Statistics

Studies have found that there is a connection between drugs and mental health issues. Many heroin users try to self-treat their anxiety and other stressful issues with drugs. This Illinois study reports that around 75 percent of heroin users indeed had some form of mental illness like ADHD, bipolar disorder, or depression.

To say there is a spike in heroin use is a bit of an understatement. Documented use of heroin has virtually doubled from 2007 to 2012. This is more than just a spike. It is an indicator of the opioid crisis in America.

Some drug specialists claim that this crisis is mainly connected to the increasing abuse of prescription painkillers like Vicodin and oxycontin, which are also in the opioid family.

What Does Heroin Really Do To Your Body?

Using heroin consistently causes your body to build up a tolerance to it. This doesn’t mean that heroin can’t harm you. What this means is that you will require more heroin to get the same level high. The more you use the more your body will depend on it. Attempting to quit heroine will leave you with symptoms. These symptoms are known as withdrawal symptoms. They could range from feeling jittery, experiencing chills, vomiting, and muscle and bone pain.

Heroin withdrawal symptoms could potentially last for a week. Some symptoms may be severe:

  • Cravings
  • Nausea
  • Shaking
  • Sweating
  • Depression
  • Nervousness
  • Agitation
  • Abdominal pain
  • Muscle spasms

Heroin use may also cause:

  • Collapsed veins
  • heart lining and valves Infections
  • Skin abscesses
  • Contraction of HIV/AIDS, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C
  • Miscarriage
  • Lung diseases, such as tuberculosis and pneumonia

Detox Program Treatment Centers

There are a ton of drug rehab and detox facilities located in Yavapai County that are worth considering. After your assessment at one of these venters, you will be on the right track to your detox and recovery in Yavapai County. Detox and withdrawals affect everyone differently. This is why it is best to find the right drug rehab and detox program and undergo professional care, this allows a safe place for you to detox, because you will be in a controlled environment.

You’ll find a number of a number of forms of detox, such as heroin detox programs in Yavapai County, alcohol detox programs in Yavapai County, and opiate detox programs in Yavapai County.  The first step in recovery is the detox process. It is vital to choose a safe, and supervised drug or alcohol detox center.

Why Choose a Heroin Detox Program In Yavapai County?

Users that wish to find a heroin detox in Yavapai County can get the help they need at a qualified treatment center. Users can detox safely at a specialized facility in Yavapai County Az, supervised by medical professionals, and have a specially designed follow-up plan which can include a period of comprehensive therapy.

Yavapai County holds Residential inpatient treatment that offers around the clock care. There are even outpatient treatment programs located within Yavapai County that offer flexible treatment programs to individuals who cannot stay in a live-in facility. This would be great for people can’t interrupt their regular lives because of work or school. In a program like this, participants usually meet a weekly, a couple of times a week.

There are also some programs available for treatment and detox in Yavapai County, AZ that offer a combination of in and outpatient services: there’s an inpatient portion for everything that requires medical supervision or partial hospitalization, and then there are intensive outpatient treatments which include outpatient clinic follow-up.

Getting Help

If you or someone you know is experiencing addiction, please call us at (928) 756-0694 or contact us here. Looking for heroin detox in Yavapai County may be easier than you think. Contacting us is the first step towards a life free from addiction!

References

https://www.verywellmind.com/what-to-expect-from-heroin-withdrawal-22049