Drug-Rehab-Prescott-Valley

Drug Rehab in Prescott Valley, Arizona

Deciding to seek help in a drug rehabilitation center is the first step on you or your loved one’s path to freedom.  Being drug-free and no longer dependent on a substance to make you feel normal or cope with life, the ultimate goal, and one that is achievable.  There are many rehabilitation centers in Arizona.  We at Granite Mountain Behavioral Healthcare are located in Prescott Valley.  Our specialists can help match you with the right treatment for your needs.

Choosing the Right Treatment

One of the first things you will need to decide when choosing treatment is if inpatient or outpatient services would work for you.  Educating yourself about these kinds of addiction treatment facilities help make your choice to enter and transition into rehab a lot easier.

Here are a few things to consider when choosing your rehab facility:

  • Location – Choosing your location will depend on whether you want a facility that is close to home or if you prefer to be further away.
  • Length of Stay – Typical program lengths start at 30 days but can last up to 90 days or more.
  • Professionalism – It is essential to check a center’s accreditation and certifications.
  • Treatment Options – Based on your needs, check on how the facility approaches treatment, and ask as many questions as you need.
  • Specialties and Additional Treatments – Research on any areas of specialty that the facility is known for and any additional treatment options that may be available.

When looking at going into a rehab program, the two main options are inpatient and outpatient.

Inpatient, or residential addiction treatment facilities, provide immersive substance use treatment.  Patients stay on-site 24 hours a day.  During their residency, they can maintain focus on their recovery.  Inpatient treatment is effective for different patients for multiple reasons, but it is typically used by those who are battling severe addictions and addiction-related issues.

The first phase of inpatient rehab involves a period of detoxification.  When a person has been abusing a drug and developed a dependency, they will experience a period of withdrawal symptoms during the detox process.  In some cases, acute withdrawal syndrome can be severe and even life-threatening.  In these circumstances, medically supervised detox in a professional facility provides the patient with a safe and comfortable environment during recovery.  Once the withdrawal process is under control during the detox phase, therapeutic efforts to address the deeper cause and maladaptive behaviors are used to identify the reason for the compulsive misuse of drugs.  This process makes up the bulk of inpatient or residential rehab.  In most cases, the recovery phase will involve a variety of treatment methods, such as counseling sessions, peer support, and if needed, medical care.  Treatment is also adjusted depending on the needs of the patient.

Treatment of psychological addiction to drugs is usually done in the second phase of the inpatient rehabilitation process.  This second part of treatment is crucial, because when a person starts to abuse a drug, not only does the physical body become addicted, but so does the mind.  Treating psychological struggles with addiction are just as important as addressing the physical symptoms.

If staying at a drug rehab center is not for you, then, there are outpatient treatment options available.  With outpatient services, you can live at home while attending substance abuse treatment sessions for several days a week at the rehabilitation facility.

Outpatient rehab programs are similar to inpatient rehab services in that there are different types of treatment depending on the types and intensity of services available.  Outpatient treatment programs can vary in length.  Some intensive outpatient programs can require a minimum of 9 hours and up to 20 hours of participation in treatment per week.  Patients can take part in this type of program for two months and up to one year if needed.  Matching the patient with the right treatment program will depend on the level of severity of the addiction, the length of time they have been using the drug, and their health and life commitments.

Individuals enrolled in outpatient programs will also have the options of individual and group therapy, support groups, medication treatments, and workshops on life-coping skills.

Ongoing Treatment

Completing your initial rehabilitation phase is just part of the recovery process.  Depending on your level of addiction and particular needs, you may also need to look at extended care and possibly long-term rehab.

Patients that seek support for lifelong sobriety will choose one of these options.  When looking at ongoing care, you can also choose between inpatient residential programs and outpatient programs.

There are also options for people who may not be ready to return home once they complete rehab.  Sober-living homes can provide living arrangements during an individual’s extended care process.  This works as a transitional period and atmosphere until a person is ready to go back into society.

Long-term rehabilitation is the same as inpatient rehab, but for a more extended period, that can range from 6 to 12 months.  This type of rehabilitation is helpful for individuals that are severely addicted or may be at risk for chronic relapse.

Patients in formal treatment programs benefit from learning better habits and new ways of thinking and behaving.  Individuals become more aware of their past mistakes and the behavior that led them to drug abuse.  Having this perception and knowledge can help them to fight future urges to relapse and slip back into a drug-dependent lifestyle.

Treatment at Granite Mountain Behavioral Healthcare

Long-term treatment is seen as the ideal approach for continuous successful recovery, but Granite Mountain Behavioral Healthcare understands that there can be financial and environmental obstacles that can make this difficult.  Each of our clients’ treatment plans is created with this in mind.

Once you arrive at our facility, you will see that we have a welcoming community environment where everyone is important and equally valued.  We offer treatment in three phases:

  • Phase I: Acceptance, Belonging, Community
  • Phase II: Enrollment, Commitment, Connection
  • Phase III: Reconstruction, Reintegration, Transformation

Phase I includes group and individual therapy sessions in varied environmental settings; community-based, supervised, nature immersion programming; and psychiatric evaluation on an as-needed basis.

In Phase II, you can expect ongoing clinical assessment; employment coaching and job acquisition; and volunteerism support and experience.

In Phase III, you will experience community leadership and mentorship; continued practice managing privileges and unsupervised time; and a 12-step involvement.

You can learn more about our recovery programs on our website.  You or loved one can also contact our facility and speak with one of our specialists today at 1-877-389-0412 about customizing the right treatment plan for you.

meth

Methamphetamine in Arizona: The Epidemic

Methamphetamine, also known as meth, has one of the largest presences in Arizona. Meth is easy to get, cheap, and strong. All of these things contribute to meth’s rise in popularity across the state. Even higher-income communities such as Scottsdale and Chandler are highly effected. Unlike cocaine, meth is a purely laboratory-created substance. Methamphetamine involves no plant source either in origin or in production, unlike heroin which comes from the milk of the heroin poppy, or like cocaine which comes from the coca plant.

Due to the volitility of this substance, it is highly recommended for someone to look for addiction treatment. But, let’s take a deeper look at this very addictive drug.

Where Does Most Meth Come From? 

Most methamphetamine comes from Mexico. There are meth labs in Arizona but they are very much in the minority. A large portion of meth comes across lesser traveled highways on the United States/Mexican border. Sometimes the drugs are smuggled in under the seats of cars or trucks, in the gas tank, or even in the car’s headlights. Other times they are transported by courier or shipped through the mail. In terms of profitability, meth makes more money for cartels than cocaine and heroin. Due to this meth is being smuggled into Arizona in record amounts.

 Why do People Start Taking Meth?

Here are some reasons that people start to take methamphetamines in particular:

  • Meth causes weight loss

Culturally women are expected to be slender and beautiful. Women who have trouble losing weight or who are not at their desired weight may take extreme measures to change that.

  • Productivity

Some people have highly stressful jobs or other life roles. Meth will keep a person awake for days and they will often believe that they have been more productive than usual because they have been awake so long. This is not always true.

  • Price

Meth is much cheaper than other drugs like cocaine. This means that someone who already suffering financial stress because of their addiction might be drawn to meth because the product is very strong and much less expensive.

  • Peer pressure

Like any drug, some people will try the drug as a way to fit in. While peer pressure does not seem like a valid reason, many people who experiment with illegal substances do not become addicted. Some people see that as proof that the drug is not as addictive as authorities warn and feel like it is safe to try for themselves.

  • Co-occurring disorder(s)

Sometimes mental illnesses like depression, PTSD, and other illnesses can cause a person a great deal of pain if they are untreated or incorrectly treated. Sometimes people with mental illnesses use drugs, alcohol, and/or gambling to try to help relieve the pressure of their illness. 

  • Trauma/Abuse

Two-thirds of children who have been sexually abused, physically abused, mentally abused, and/or abused in other ways grow up to develop a substance abuse problem. It is important to remember that the vast majority of sexual abuse of children is perpetrated by either a family member or some other adult that the parents or guardians place trust in. This can cause a child anxiety about coming forward about their abuse. Abuse is a direct cause of addiction. 

Does Meth Attract Violence?

Unfortunately, during some stages of the methamphetamine high, victims of methamphetamine addiction can become very violent. There are even reports that the sight of a police uniform can cause a victim of addiction to become violent for a variety of reasons. Some of those reasons are caused by the drug itself. Meth can cause behaviors/feelings of:

  • Paranoia
  • Agitation
  • Psychosis

Although paranoia is a very real side effect of the drug itself, the feeling of paranoia can be heightened by the fact that police are actively looking for people who are high. The phenomenon of undercover police can heighten this.

Can Meth Cause Social Problems?

In addition to this meth can cause problems with the frontal lobe of the brain which is used to inhibit aggressive impulses. Meth can promote more intense emotions than a person would normally feel. Not only this but it can mean problems with interpersonal communications. 

These problems might cause the victim of addiction to incorrectly read their situation because of miscommunication between themselves and others, or give incorrect cues and use incorrect words that cause other people to think that the victim of addiction has bad intentions or different motivations than they have.

Are People Addicted to Meth in Danger?

Not only are people who are the victims of meth addiction at risk from the police, but they are often also at risk from people who want to take advantage of them like drug dealers. Often drug dealers are not only untrustworthy, but they can also be members of criminal motorcycle gangs. 

Over 70% of state and local law enforcement in Arizona and the rest of the western half of the United States agree that meth is their primary drug problem. Part of this is because of the danger surrounding methamphetamine control. Because most meth comes from powerful Mexican drug cartels, police and cartels are brought into conflict with each other. This can be extremely dangerous for the victims of addictions who are often caught in the middle. 

Not only are the cartels and motorcycle gangs a major cause of violence, other less visible but still highly violent gangs and individuals are part of the methamphetamine conflict. These smaller gangs are sometimes used to disseminate the drugs into the community.

What are the Health Issues Related to Methamphetamine Use? 

Chronic uses of meth have reported:

  •  Anxiety
  • Confusion in day to day life
  • Insomnia
  • Mood imbalances
  • Violent behavior
  • Hallucinations like feeling multiple insects crawling on their skin

Some neurological issues are

  • Impaired learning
  • Impaired decision-making capabilities
  • Memory loss
  • Increased distractibility

Body/Non- Neurological Problems:

  • Severe dental problems
  • Repetitive motor activity
  • Weight loss
  • Reduced motor speed

What Happens if a Pregnant Woman Uses Meth? 

Using meth during pregnancy can cause severe problems for both mother and child. If a pregnant woman takes drugs the drugs pass through the amniotic sac and umbilical cord. This means that the baby is born addicted to drugs. These children are born with built-in behavioral problems that cannot be outgrown. Some of the problems a baby born addicted to methamphetamine faces are: 

  • Motor deficits

Motor deficits are when coordination and use of the muscles including hands and legs are significantly less developed than normal. 

  • Behavioral issues

Behavioral issues can cause problems for a child not only at home but in school. A child with behavioral issues often does not receive positive attention from teachers and other students.

  • Executive function issues

Executive function in a brain is vital for success in life. Some tasks grouped in executive function are Memory, mental flexibility, and self-control. Impairment of executive function will not only make the child hard to manage in the classroom, but the child will also often have behavioral issues at home too. Executive function has to be developed in a child. Children are not born with them. However, if a child is born to a woman who is taking methamphetamine is much harder for the child to develop good executive function.

It is worth noting that it is hard to find information on methamphetamine’s impact on infants. Often a woman who is addicted while pregnant will have been using multiple substances during the pregnancy.

It is also worth noting that rape victims are far more likely to abuse drugs than women who have not been raped. The information found provided does not include women who have been raped as children. Often these cases are not brought before the court and there is no formal record of the numbers and therefore no way to assess the situation. 

What Factors Influence Drug Addiction?

Often factors such as family substance abuse and poverty play a role. Sometimes it can seem virtually impossible for a child to lift themselves out of poverty. It is made harder when the child’s parents or other caretakers are addicted to drugs. Addiction to drugs causes a chaotic home life for a child. This makes it far more difficult to study at home, attain proper nutrition, get adequate sleep, and receive other physical support from the parent or guardian. The child often does not get the emotional support that they need to grow up well adjusted.

This can often lead the child to join a gang for emotional support as well as personal protection. The child might become addicted to drugs the gang might sell as well. It is a self-perpetuating cycle that no child deserves.

Does Price Matter When Buying Drugs?

Part of the attraction of meth is not only how easy it is to get but how cheap it is. Because methamphetamine is much cheaper than oxycodone and cocaine it is more attractive to some people who are heavily addicted to drugs. The price means that they can buy a bigger supply and can have less of a problem finding enough money to buy more of the drug.

Methamphetamine is a highly addictive drug that has caused many problems in our state and still causes problems today. However, there is help. Granite Mountain Behavioral Health Care is here to help you.

Please contact us here https://granitemountainbhc.com/contact-us/ (not sure this is right)

Call us at: (877) 389-0412

Reference:

5 most dangerous drugs

Arizona: The Top Five Most Dangerous Drugs

While all drugs are dangerous, there are five that are especially dangerous for the inhabitants of Arizona. It is highly recommended that anyone suffering from addiction to any of these substances seek addiction treatment.  Whether it is because they are easier to obtain, cheaper, or simply more deadly here are the top five most dangerous drugs in Arizona. 

1.) Fentanyl 

Fentanyl is being brought across the Mexican border disguised as other drugs. Fentanyl is 50-100 times stronger than morphine. This makes the overdose possibility for people who unknowingly use fentanyl much higher. It also sets a higher probability of overdose for people who have just started fentanyl and do not know how much to take or have not built up a tolerance to it.

While Fentanyl has some pleasurable side effects that people who are the victims of addiction seek: 

  •       Reduced feelings of pain
  •       Euphoria
  •       Relaxation

There are many long-term consequences to continued abuse of fentanyl-like:

  •       Damage to multiple organ systems
  •       Worsening mental health issues

One of the most dangerous things about fentanyl is that many times fentanyl is added to heroin and/or other drugs without the user knowing fentanyl has been added. Fentanyl is very cheap, making it an attractive way to boost the effectiveness of a drug. Unfortunately, because fentanyl is so potent it can be extremely deadly.

2.) Heroin

Heroin is one of the most addictive drugs in the world. Often heroin use co-occurs with depression. Some people abuse heroin because their depression is either untreated or improperly managed. Heroin usually comes in the form of powder, but it can come in many other forms such as a blackish tar-like substance.

Some of the short-term effects of heroin are:

  •       A rush of pleasure
  •       Dreamy contentment
  •       Drowsiness
  •       Talkative
  •       Loss of appetite
  •       Insomnia
  •       Lethargy

Some of the long-term consequences of heroin are:

  •       Loss of appetite
  •       Apathy
  •       Neglect of personal safety
  •       Neglect of hygiene
  •       Generalized pain when not enough heroin is in the person’s body

Because of Arizona’s hot climate, neglecting personal safety by going out in harsh conditions without the means to stay cool and hydrated can be deadly both in and out of the city. Many establishments tend to discriminate and try not to allow someone who has an obvious drug dependency problem help, even in the sweltering heat. Further out in the desert there might simply be nowhere to get water or stop to cool down on the way to acquire drugs. 

3.) Methamphetamine 

Meth is one of the most dangerous drugs in Arizona because it is very cheap and easily available. Much of the meth in Arizona comes across the border from the Mexican cartels. There are, however, a few independent meth suppliers in the United States. Not only is the drug itself dangerous but the clash between the rival criminal gangs who distribute the drugs leaves many addicts as collateral damage in the crossfire.

Some of the short-term effects of meth are: 

  •       Increased alertness
  •       Increased attention
  •       Reduced tiredness
  •       Increased energy
  •       Increased confidence

Some of the long-term consequences of methamphetamine are:

  •       Paranoia/psychosis
  •       Aggression
  •       Confusion
  •       Agitation

One of the problems with meth is that it might be harder for someone to know their limits in punishing weather. If water and shade are available the victim of addiction may not stop to take advantage of them.

4.) Alcohol 

Although alcohol is a commonly used drug and many people can use it safely, but for many people, alcohol can become addictive. One of the big problems with alcohol addiction is that alcohol is present at many social events. One of the important reasons to go to a professional rehabilitation clinic is that we can teach you how to say no to alcohol in a situation-appropriate way. Addiction is a medical condition and you have the right to keep as much privacy and to let as many people know as you choose. 

A few side effects of alcohol that people find desirable are:

  •       Increased confidence
  •       Promotes relaxation
  •       Euphoria
  •       Talkativeness

Alcohol can affect different people differently. Some of the negative short-term effects of alcohol are: 

  •       Impaired judgment
  •       Vomiting
  •       Diarrhea
  •       Blackouts
  •       Decreased perception
  •       Decreased coordination
  •       Breathing difficulties

Some of the negative long-term effects of binge drinking alcohol abuse are: 

  •       Liver damage
  •       Nerve damage
  •       High blood pressure
  •       Stroke
  •       Vitamin B1 Deficiency
  •       Sexual problems

Alcoholism is notorious for being responsible for many car crashes and other vehicle-related injuries. This is especially dangerous in states like Arizona that have many out of the way roads in the more remote parts of the country, which can reach dangerously high temperatures for people stranded on the side of the road.

Phoenix, the 5th largest city in the United States, is very dependent on its road system. It is very hard, if not impossible for people to get around Phoenix without a car. This makes it especially devastating if someone loses their license if they are caught driving under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs.

 5.) Cocaine

Cocaine is one of the most famous drugs in the country. It is notorious for being the drug of choice for the rich and powerful stock brokers in movies. Unfortunately, it is neither safe nor glamorous in reality. Some indirect risks from cocaine are HIV and hepatitis C when the cocaine is injected from a shared needle.

Other indirect risks of cocaine are sexually transmitted infections like gonorrhea. Someone using cocaine can catch these infections from unprotected sex. Many drugs like cocaine lower inhibitions and might put someone in a riskier situation than they would enter on their own. 

You can also get your driver’s license suspended or taken away if you operate a vehicle under the influence of cocaine. Arizona has little public transportation available. In some areas in the state, there is no public transportation and sometimes no taxi services.

Some of the short-term side effects of cocaine are: 

  •       Extreme sensitivity to touch, sound, and sights
  •       Intense happiness
  •       Anger
  •       Paranoia
  •       Decreased appetite

There are multiple long-term side effects to continuous cocaine addiction such as: 

  •       Seizures
  •       Heart attack
  •       Stroke
  •       Heart disease
  •       Sexual trouble
  •       Mood problems
  •       Lung damage
  •       Bowel decay (if swallowed)

Cocaine is a highly addictive drug. Unfortunately, because it seems so glamorous people seem to think that it is not nearly as problematic as it is. Cocaine is very addictive and you cannot just stop once you realize how bad it is.

What Can I Do About My Loved One’s Drug Addiction?

If someone you know and love is addicted to drugs the best thing that you can do is get them to a drug rehabilitation center as soon as possible. Not only do all drugs, including alcohol, pose an overdose risk the long-term abuse of drugs can cause many more additional problems than would initially appear over the short term. 

Is Drug Rehabilitation Expensive?

Unfortunately, addiction is not a problem that will go away if you ignore it. It will only get worse. Not only will the addiction have to be dealt with sometime in the future if it is not dealt with now, but the medical costs from correcting the damage done by long term drug abuse are also staggering.

Are the Untreated Side Effects of Long Term Drug Abuse Expensive? 

Something as routine as a stroke, which can be caused by long term cocaine use, can bring on a multitude of expenses such as: 

  •       $150-$3,000 emergency room visit depending on insurance if the patient has insurance

If the patient does not have insurance the cost can be considerably more

  •       $9,100 per day hospital stay

 If it is am ischemic stroke the stay is generally 5.6 days, if it is a hemorrhagic stroke the stay is generally 8.4 days 

  •       If it is an ischemic stroke the most promising treatment is a “clot-busting” drug. These cost $2,000

Other treatments like angioplasty and stents are $11,000-$41,000

Can Long Term Drug Abuse Symptoms Be Treated? 

Issues like increased aggression from methamphetamine, sexual problems from alcoholism, and loss of appetite from heroin can be much harder to treat. Many, like bowel decay from continuous cocaine use, are much more ominous and would likely require hospital stays longer than 5.6 days.

Whether someone has been addicted for a short amount of time or years drug rehabilitation is necessary if a person wants to be free of drugs. Please commit to rehabilitation before your health suffers even more. 

What Are Other Benefits of Drug Treatment? 

For these drugs, one of the biggest benefits of treatment is removing your loved one from the environment in which they do drugs. The use of many drugs like heroin can cause a person to neglect their safety and even turn to crime to either obtain drugs directly or to obtain the means to buy drugs.

People with addiction are often causalities of the drug war, caught between the police, other law agencies, and criminal organizations like gangs or cartels. People with addiction are often the ones who suffer the most in these situations.

What Can I Do to Stay Safe? 

In the end, we at Granite Mountain Behavioral Health simply ask that you stay safe. We know that while our state is very beautiful it can also be very treacherous for people who are taking mind/mood-altering substances, especially people in the more remote areas. If you are using please do not wait until it is too late. Make a safety kit to carry with you in your car or on your body if possible. Please include at least:

  •       At least two bottles of water
  •       A travel-sized first aid kit
  •       Fully charged cell phone
  •       Cell phone charger
  •       At least one meal bar
  •       Narcan

What is Narcan?

Narcan is a nasal spray that can reverse the effects of an opioid overdose. Unfortunately, Narcan only works for opioid overdoses. That makes it important to also know CPR and other emergency procedures if your friend or loved one overdose on substances like alcohol, or cocaine which cannot be helped by Narcan.

Am I Safe?

While these items will not help you in all situations we hope that by simply carrying these few things with you, your odds of survival will increase if you are caught outdoors without a place to rest, whether or not you are currently under the influence of drugs, about to take drugs, or just coming off a high. Contact us for more information about our addiction treatment programs, or call us at (877) 389-0412.

  

References:

 

Five Stages of Change

The Transtheoretical Model of Change is currently the most complete picture we have in psychology to explain how and why individuals are able to create and sustain behavioral or attitudinal changes in their lives. It is my hope that by helping the reader to better understand this model I can help you to better understand the behavior of a loved one suffering from addiction. This model is primarily based on the work of Prochaska and DiClemente who first developed it in a study published in 1983. While useful and informative when dealing with substance use it should be understood that the insight provided by this model need not be limited to the treatment of addiction. It has been shown to be descriptive of behavioral change across a wide spectrum of behaviors and individuals.

granite mountain behavioral healthcare

1. Precontemplation

Individuals in this stage often are resistant to any mention or conversation of the behavior in question.

The precontemplation stage is characterized by an individual having no intention of modifying his or her behavior. Often he or she is not able to acknowledge that said behavior has any negative impact on themselves or others. Individuals in this stage often are resistant to any mention or conversation of the behavior in question. He or she is not engaged in the change process in an immediate sense and may resist any effort from others aimed at getting them to quit. Often individuals in this stage are thought to be in denial. My experience of these individuals, more often than not, is that they are aware of their behavior(s) but don’t see them as a problem yet. 

granite mountain behavioral healthcare

2. Contemplation

He or she is now more aware of the personal and social consequences of their actions.

During the contemplation stage of change the individual in question is becoming aware that his or her behavior is problematic. He or she is now more aware of the personal and social consequences of their actions. Parallel to this, the individual is beginning to be more cognizant of the benefits of change. That said he or she is often still ambivalent of undertaking the change. At times an individual will pass through this stage very quickly while for others it may take months or years. As someone concerned with a loved one suffering from addiction you will most often find them more open to conversation and information surrounding their problematic behavior. Often for substance use disorder the fear of the detox process, and other short term costs associated with quitting will nag at the individual. They are thinking about quitting and want to want to stop.

granite mountain behavioral healthcare

3. Preparation

Preparation is one of the shortest stages and often lasts no more than a couple of weeks

In the preparation stage of change the person of concern is now prepared to make a change. This could also be called the research phase as often one in this stage will actively be attempting to accumulate information and knowledge germane to their problem. He or she may be calling treatment centers and other providers, or be searching on the internet for information about their problem. He or she may even be attempting to take their first tentative steps toward modifying their behavior or abstaining completely. Preparation is one of the shortest stages and often lasts no more than a couple of weeks.

4. Action

This is also a very tenuous time as success is largely dependent on the willpower and commitment of the individual

This is the shortest of the stages and lasts no more than six months. The individual has begun to take decisive noticeable actions to change or abstain from the behavior in question. This is also a very tenuous time as success is largely dependent on the willpower and commitment of the individual. He or she is paying the short term costs of change without yet enjoying many of the benefits. Also, the individual will not yet have been able to develop many methods for staying committed to change or coping mechanisms for when stress and temptation arise. Risk of relapse is greatest during the action stage.

5. Maintenance

By this point one will be able to mostly avoid temptation to return to former behavior and if tempted will have developed coping mechanisms to successfully overcome the temptation.

After six months in the Action stage an individual will progress into the maintenance stage of change. During maintenance an individual’s behavior has changed. With addiction he or she will be abstinent. By this point one will be able to mostly avoid temptation to return to former behavior and if tempted will have developed coping mechanisms to successfully overcome the temptation. A maintainer will be increasingly focused on the good that has come as a result of change and will be determined to maintain the new state of affairs moving forward. He or she will feel a strong sense of self efficacy and satisfaction at having been able to change.

In the original work by Prochaska and DiClemente there was a sixth stage that they termed Termination. In Termination, former behaviors are non existent and are no longer perceived in a positive fashion ever. I find the inclusion of this stage problematic as it relates to addiction. Addiction is a chronic disease and often relapse is a component of change. This is true of many other chronic medical conditions. The rate of relapse in addiction is lower than with asthma and hypertension, and only marginally higher than with diabetes. Therefore, while not a necessary consequence relapse happens often enough that it needs to be considered a part of the process of change. It is most useful to move away from the conception of relapse as a personal failing. Rather in viewing it within the broader scope of chronic illness, as I’ve tried to illustrate above, we can empower an individual to learn from the process and not to let it derail the overall effort at recovery.

While not specifically noted in the research it is imperative to understand that most often it is the efforts of family and friends to support an individual in making a change that creates momentum moving through the stages. It is never too early to start a conversation. There are many methods which can be employed to do so and to help support health change in an individual and within a family system.

If you are concerned that a loved one is in active addiction and need help please consult a professional, their guidance can be indispensable. If you have questions, or concerns, and we can be helpful please don’t hesitate to contact us at Granite Mountain BHC, through our website or by phone at 844-878-3221. We are here to help.

Until next time

Your friend in service,

Rob Campbell


If you or someone you know is in need of help for substance use disorder call us today at 1-844-878-3221 or reach out to us via email.

What To Expect During The Alcohol Detox Process

granite mountain behavioral healthcare

We have received many questions lately through our website, social media, and intake line related to the process of alcohol detox. As a result I thought I would write an article laying out the detox process as it relates to alcohol use disorder. I will endeavor to cover the stages of detox, the symptoms associated with each, and some tips on how to make the process easier. 

I would like to start by stating some facts which are germain to the topic.

  1. Alcohol is the third leading cause of preventable deaths in the United States.  Almost 90,000 people a year die of alcohol related deaths in this country

  2. 1 out of every 3 emergency room visits in the United States is related to alcohol use

  3. More than 17.6 million Americans suffer from some form of Alcohol use disorder

granite mountain behavioral healthcare

The above statistics make clear the scope and nature of the social problem that alcohol use disorder presents. It affects every community in our country, and many families. If you or a loved one are suffering from alcohol use disorder know that you are not alone, and that help is available if you want it.

When an individual who has been drinking excessively decides that it is time to stop drinking it is seldom wise to undertake this process alone.  Rather it is advisable to place yourself under the care of a doctor or other medical professional.  It is perhaps because of the wide acceptance of drinking in our society that many underestimate the severity of the alcohol withdrawal process, thinking it “won’t be that bad”. Conversely the alcohol detox process can be one of the most challenging both mentally and medically speaking.  The withdrawal process from alcohol is most often characterized as having three distinct phases. They are:

  • Phase 1 typically begins from 6 hours to 24 hours after an individual last consumes alcohol.  The severity of the the symptoms during this phase will be determined by how long and how much alcohol a person has been consuming.  The typical symptoms of the first phase of withdrawal can include; nervousness, anxiety, headache, nausea, vomiting, tremors, loss of appetite, tremors, and mood swings.

The first phase of withdrawal can last for anywhere between 24 and 72 hours. 

  • Phase 2 typically sets in from 24 to 72 hours after an individual last consumed alcohol.  The typical symptoms of this phase can include; increased levels of mental confusion, irregular heart rate, difficulty breathing, muscle rigidity, increased blood pressure, and in some cases hallucinations.  It ought to be clear that this phase is potentially much more dangerous to an individual, and often requires one be under the care of trained medical staff.

  • About one out of three people enter into phase 3 of withdrawal from alcohol.  This phase is called Delirium Tremens (DT).  A person can enter DT anywhere from 3 days after cessation of drinking to as long as 2 weeks after last consuming alcohol.  This phase of withdrawal is the most dangerous and absolutely requires an individual to be in some form of inpatient treatment.  Some of the symptoms include; disorientation, dissociation, hallucination, Grand Mal seizures, and in some cases death.

If you or a loved one are considering cessation of drinking, consult with a medical professional and seek treatment. There are many medications available to help ease the symptoms of detox from alcohol, and a trained medical professional can help you to make sound decisions as to their potential to help. 

The withdrawal process from alcohol can be dangerous and the decision to undertake the process can be frightening.  However, if you or a loved one is in a position where life is becoming impossible it is important not to let the fear of detox keep you from transforming your life.  Many of us have been through it and when we look back believe it was the most important decision we have ever made.  It is my hope that this short article has answered many of the questions the reader may have regarding the process of detox.  If after reading this you still have questions or concerns please reach out to our team.  We are happy to help whether you utilize our services or not.  The most important thing to us is that you or your loved one gets the help they need.

 

Your friend in service,
Rob Campbell

VP of Communications & Market Development


If you would like to speak to a professional about treatment for you or your loved one, please don’t hesitate to contact us today!


1. CDC, Fact Sheets: Alcohol Use and Your Health (2018), https://www.cdc.gov/alcohol/fact-sheets/alcohol-use.htm.

2. Lisa Mahapatra, 1 out of 3 ER Visits Are Alcohol Related (IBT: 2013), http://www.ibtimes.com/1-out-3-er-visits-are-alcohol-related-heres-what-patients-drank-charts-1395699.

3. NCADD, Facts About Alcohol (2015), https://www.ncadd.org/about-addiction/alcohol/facts-about-alcohol.