8 Reasons You’ll Love Granite Mountain Behavioral

Typically in this blog, we try and bring our readers topics that will inform, educate, and inspire.  At the risk of seeming self-indulgent, I wanted to spend some time today highlighting eight things I feel make Granite Mountain BHC special.  While I have a vested interest in the work we do, I am incredibly proud of our facility, and everyone who works for us. We were founded in a collective effort to improve on the typical treatment experience.  Every single person who works with us shares our vision of creating a recovery community that is second to none. We try to accomplish this lofty goal at every level of our facility. Below I have attempted to provides some examples of the things that, to me, make us so unique, and why, I think you’ll love us: 

1. Recover Strong

Recover Strong is the cornerstone of our treatment model.  It is an innovative approach to treating substance use disorder and its common comorbidities.  Based on the neuroscience of addiction, Recover Strong is a therapeutic modality which endeavors to unlock the brain’s potential to heal itself.  It does this through engaging the natural functions of neurogenesis and neuroplasticity. Physical movement is an integral part of our evolutionary past, we have evolved to move.  Each time our Recover Strong group meets we begin with a warm-up, and then head directly into the WOD (workout of the day). This workout is purposely designed so that each participant is able to push themselves to their personal level of exertion for the day.  Each time in the gym we are aiming to have all participants get their heart rate to 75%-85% of max heart rate for 30-40 minutes. Hitting these two markers creates some extraordinary effects in the brain. The direct impact of increased information processing capacity and the flood of hormones into the mind will last for 2-4 hours.  Our trainers and other staff who are present ensure that whether a particular patient is an advanced athlete or someone who hasn’t worked out in years they are able to work out in a safe and supportive environment. The community and camaraderie that has grown around Recover Strong is something that needs to be seen to be believed.

2. Small in Size, Big in Heart

At Granite Mountain BHC we have made the conscious choice to keep our community small in size. It is of paramount importance to us that we ensure that each patient has truly individualized care.   Suffering from addiction is often lonely and isolated. It is one of our core beliefs that creating an authentic connection is essential to recovery, and we work hard to create a community that encourages these relationships to form.  With a low staff to patient ratio, we are able to make sure that each patient has as much individualized care as he or she needs. At Granite Mountain, each patient becomes an integral part of our community. We believe that while we may all serve different roles within the community each is an indispensable part of the whole. 

3. Innovative Treatment

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The treatment industry is in many respects stuck in the past.  Many treatment facilities base their clinical approach on scientific research that is several decades old.  It is hard to imagine another healthcare environment where this would be the case. At Granite Mountain, we believe that when people’s lives are on the line “good enough” isn’t good enough.  We are continually finding ways to bring the newest and most significant research being done in the field to bear for the benefit of our patients and their families. Whether it is through the utilization of a neuro-scientific approach to addiction or utilizing some of the latest developments in the treatment of trauma we are continually striving to create better more permanent outcomes for our patients.

4.  Beautiful Natural Setting

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Serenity may ultimately be an internal experience of one’s own consciousness, but it is often inspired by peaceful surroundings and the pure sublimity of nature.  Nestled in the high desert beauty of Northern Arizona, Granite Mountain BHC has its share of both. Our patients are treated to natural splendor on a daily basis. Each day we invite patients and staff to enjoy the sun and views from our facility. Additionally, we make many planned excursions into the local state and national parks including Sedona and the Grand Canyon. 

5.  Homestyle living

While a patient of Granite Mountain each person lives in a single family home style residence.  Each home is comfortable and well appointed. We have purposely avoided the institutional feel associated with many treatment programs.  We want our community members to feel comfortable and at ease while with us. After a long day of therapy, volunteering, or work it is great to be able to unwind in the comfort of one’s own home.  Whether watching TV, reading a book, or chatting with one’s housemates or one of the on-site staff, this time at the end of each day is often reported to be the most valuable. This style of housing also enables us to create a therapeutic environment that approximates living at home.  Patients are able to work with staff on many of the life skills that will be needed upon graduation.

6.  Commitment not Compliance

Too often when entering treatment, a new patient is greeted with a long list of “rules” that must be followed.  These rules aim to create compliance within the community. There is no evidence that this is an effective mechanism to generate long-term recovery.   We believe that for adults to recover they need to be engaged in their recovery process. One of the primary ways we accomplish this is by tapping into a patient’s fundamental commitment to growth.  Commitment, not compliance is the path to real change.

 7.  Committed and Involved Staff

The first thing most visitors notice when they attend our Recover Strong group for the first time is that our staff are in the gym sweating alongside our patients.  Our therapists, our house managers, and even our Executive Director, we all participate. You can’t just talk about community you have to build it actively. Our staff is hand selected for experience, training, and commitment to our patients.   No challenge is too big or problem too small for us. If it is troubling a member of our community, it is our top priority. Our leadership team is on site daily and is integrally involved in all aspects of community life. This sets the tone for the care and dedication we expect.  In addition to being “employees,” our staff are models of recovery for our patients. This is a responsibility all of our team take very seriously.

 8.  A Community dedicated to healing body, mind, and spirit

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We are a community that believes in healing the whole person.  Our dedication to implementing innovative solutions to addiction, creating a community of authentic connection, and to all of our community members is what sets us apart and makes us a special place to be. 

Come schedule a visit at our facility and see for yourself what there is to love about Granite Mountain BHC.

Please reach out to us if we can answer any questions or provide other assistance, we are here to help.  We can be reached through our website or by phone at 844-878-3221

Until next time
Your friend in service,
Rob Campbell


To get help for substance use disorder today please contact us today

Addiction in the Age of Brain Science

Studying The Brain Functions

In this talk Markus Heilig presents new findings in the science of addiction, as viewed from a neuroscientific view point. Dr Heilig is a professor of psychiatry and the founding director of a new Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience at Linkoping University. His research group studies brain processes connected to stress and negative emotionality and how these contribute to psychiatric disorders including addictive disorder.

In this video Dr Heilig illustrates the role social exclusion plays in the addictive cycle. He begins the talk by illustrating that while early on in an addicts using history the brain’s reward center is primarily responsible for triggering using behavior, this is not the case by the time an addict is seeking help. At this point in the life cycle of addiction the individual is not being motivated by the brain’s reward center he or she is now being driven to action through the brain stress and aversion system. That is to say early on in someone’s substance use, they are trying to capture a good feeling, but by the end they are trying to avoid feeling miserable.  The stress and aversion system has been compromised in such a way that it is overactive. The addicts brain is super sensitive to feelings of stress, anxiety, and fear. Meaning that in the absence of a mood altering substance the addict is plunged into a state of misery.

Understanding The Damage

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This damage to the brain, and its particular instantiation is complicated by our very nature a social group orientated primates. For us, as humans, one of the most profound stressors is social exclusion, being marginalized. The particular problem for addicts in this respect is that their lifestyle creates, by its nature social exclusion. Acute experiences of these stressors drive craving. Intense craving causes relapse. Relapse begets behavior that results in social exclusion. This cycles is repeated over and over again. Dr Heilig states, that unless we can create an intervention in this cycle by offering alternative measures to diffuse the stress the addict has little hope of recovery.

While neuroscience may be a long way from “curing” addiction. As a discipline they have begun to take the problem seriously. At Granite Mountain Behavioral Healthcare we also take addictive disorder seriously. Our program is based on current neuroscientific research. We engage in physical exercise as a way to generate neuroregeneration within our patient population. In effect we are working to undo the damage to the brain’s stress and aversion system that has rendered it hyperactive. We do this in a community setting that is grounded in an effort to help our patients feel a real sense of connection with each other and with the staff. Working to minimize or eliminate feelings of social exclusion within our community. We are attacking the addictive cycle on at least two fronts each day.

As the science of addiction continues to evolve so will our program in lock step. We are committed to bringing to bear the newest advances for the benefit of our patients. We are currently working to develop a fully realized nutritional component to our program. This element of programing won’t simply be about nutrition for general health and wellbeing. Rather it will be a nutritional plan specifically designed to support and create neuroregeneration.

If you or a loved one is suffering from addiction please contact us.

Until next time
Your friend in service,
Rob Campbell
VP of Communications & Market Development


If you or someone you love is struggling with substance use disorder please contact us today

Patient Brokers, Who’s Responsible and What Can be Done?: Part 1

By now I’m sure many if not all of you reading this are familiar with the terms “patient broker” or, “client broker”.  If you are not what the terms refer to is an individual who for a fee, paid by a treatment facility, will make a referral to that facility.  The way that this often works is that the broker “identifies” an addict in need of help, and then the broker starts calling treatment centers and negotiating a fee for placement.  These fees can be in excess of $5000 dollars per client. Thus referrals are made not based on clinical need, therapeutic fit, or really in any way meaningfully tied to the interests of the patient.  Rather these placement decisions are being made on the financial incentive for the facility and the broker. I want to spend a few minutes today sharing with you my thoughts on this problem and perhaps begin to describe a better way forward for our industry and our patients.

The Hydra of Our Industry

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Sly And Cunning

Patient brokers come in many different forms.  Many are individuals with no professional background in addiction treatment at all.  These individuals quite literally will troll 12 step meetings, local detoxes, and in some instances even the local skid row,  trying to identify individuals who are suffering from addiction and desperate for help. When they find somebody they approach them under the guise of being able to help them find treatment. Many represent themselves as working directly for treatment centers when in fact they do not.  They will assure the individual addict that they can get them help, that they can get them to a safe place, that they can help them get sober. When the addict, desperate for a new life, agrees to seek treatment, the brokers work begins. The broker will begin calling treatment centers.  Leading not with questions about the therapeutic validity of the facility’s work but with the insurance information. The most valuable are those with PPO insurance with out-of-network benefits. the line between this sort of activity end human trafficking seems murky to me.

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Not all patient brokers are this blatant, or have quite this level of amorality.  Many come in the form of professionals. Some are Therapeutic Placement Consultants, some are Interventionists.  Brokers of this stripe will charge a family anywhere from a few hundred to a few thousand dollars with the promise, again, of being able to help an addict to recovery.  After collecting money from the family and doing their work they turn around and “sell” the human being to the highest bidder. Often times in this sort of arrangement it is not on a per head basis.  Rather payment comes in the form of large year end “bonuses”. I know of one program that pays their “best” therapeutic placement consultant $50,000 at the end of the year. I try not to be a cynical person, but it is hard for me to see how a many thousand dollar payment would not influence placement decisions.   Many times these financial arrangements are not disclosed to the families of the addict. By not disclosing this information the family is not in a position to make a free and informed decision. I want to be clear that in no way am I alleging that all placement consultants or all interventionists operate in this way.  There are many highly competent, highly trained, and highly ethical individuals in both of these positions across the country. I have had the pleasure of knowing, and working with many.

The Buy-Side

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Bad Actors Ruin It All

The bad actors in the industry give anyone trying to do a professional job with high standards of conduct a bad name.  It would be very easy to just cast blame at the brokers and say that they are the problem. This, in my view, is not true.  They are without hesitation a part of the problem, but only a part. Another part of the problem are the facilities who work with these individuals.  In any transaction the “buy” side has as much culpability as the “sell” side. If collectively treatment centers refused to buy patients the brokers would have no one to sell to, and the problem would go away.  The persistent nature of this issue appears to be a reflection of an inadequate understanding on the part of treatment facilities of how to engage patients and their families in a meaningful way, how to create meaningful relationships with clinicians and other providers who are already engaged with the population of addicts.  In some ways it is a failure of innovation on the part of treatment facilities. As long as facilities continue to be willing to buy their patients there will be individuals willing to sell them patients.

 

Root Cause

I believe that the problem runs even deeper than these two aspects.  The true nature of the problem is associated with the stigma we as a community still have in regards to those suffering from addiction.  Many in our communities, in the face of the science attached, still want to believe that if an addict wanted to change enough they would.  As a consequence of this belief they view (often unconsciously) addiction as a moral failure, or a failure in character. As a result our communities are less concerned with how addicts are treated when compared to the care and concern we express toward other sufferers of chronic disease.  Can you imagine an oncology hospital “buying” cancer patients, or a memory specialist “buying” patients suffering from Alzheimer’s without public outrage? I have a hard time imagining such a situation. What then is the difference? All are chronic diseases, which cause massive destruction to the lives of the suffer and those tied to them by affection.  The difference, as stated above, is in the way society views these diseases. If we want to change the outcomes for those suffering from addiction we need to change the way, we as a society, view addiction. We need to end the stigma.

 

Moving Toward A Solution

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How do we move toward a solution?  The most immediate answer I see to this dilemma is to raise the bar of entry into the industry for professionals.  In any domain, a low bar of entry allows bad actors in. We need to adopt a standard of professionalism across the industry.  We need increased oversight and licensing requirements for those working in the field. By doing this we will make it harder for those with bad intentions to get in, we will be able to identify and stop them sooner, and will make it more transparent who can be relied on.  This will only happen when our industry demands it of ourselves. If we do this it will give us time to change the stigma attached to addiction. It will restore the public’s faith in us as a means of recovery for those suffering from addiction.

In the next part of this series we will be examining the proposed state bill in Arizona that is currently under consideration, and whether or not it will adequately address the problem.  In subsequent segments we will present interviews from each side of this issue. I believe that it is only in honestly facing a problem that we can begin to heal from it. We can and must do more.

 

Until next time
Your friend in service,
Rob Campbell
VP of Communications & Market Development


If you or your loved one is in need of help for substance use disorder please call us today @ 1.844.878.3221

Transitioning Into Recovery, A Family Perspective: Part III

In the first two parts of this series we have examined how to approach the subject of treatment with a loved one suffering from drug or alcohol addiction. Further we looked at how to help that individual make the transition into treatment. In the previous two pieces (which you can find here and here) I tried to make many helpful suggestions and to provide some insight into the potential pitfalls. In this article I would like to make some good general suggestions on how to help a loved one transition back into home life and their native community upon completing a treatment program. Getting sober is one thing, but of course the real goal is having someone stay sober. While we can’t do it for them, as the family of an addict we have a role to play in helping them stay sober. This article should is in no way meant to replace working with a professional. Every individual situation is unique and no one article could possible address every unique iteration of sobriety or family dynamics.

Returning To Your Home Environment

For many addicts returning home from treatment can be a shock to the system. For the past several months they have been sequestered in a supportive community with both staff and peers committed to their recovery. The individual has been receiving as much as six hours of daily therapy, in addition to their engagement in a 12 step fellowship. Upon graduation they return home and without a proper after care program in place can begin to experience a significant degree of loss. This experience of loss can be a major hurdle for one who is newly sober. For this reason it is often recommended to have the individual enter an aftercare program upon graduation from long term treatment. Aftercare programs take many forms. It can be as simple as seeing a therapist or other professional clinician once a week. On the other extreme it could be a five day a week four hour a day outpatient program. Each individual’s therapeutic need will be there own and any meaningful long term program will make aftercare recommendations to the patient and his or her family. In most cases the facility can and will help coordinate with local service providers on behalf of the patient. The important thing is that whatever the specific plan turns out to be the addict feels therapeutically supported and a part of a larger community of recovery.

Having an After Care Plan…. And Following Through With It

This thought brings us to our next point which is the importance for the addict of engaging in a 12 step fellowship and the recovery community upon arriving home. The old suggestion of a 90 in 90 (attending 90 12 step meetings in 90 days) is advisable but not mandatory. Almost everywhere in this country these days has a wealth of 12 step meetings on a weekly basis. One can find a meeting directory most often by Googling the name of the 12 step fellowship (i.e. AA, CA, GA, HA, NA, etc) and the name of your town. 12 step fellowships are still the largest support network for alcoholics and addicts available. To this day they are also the most effective. The important aspects are to attend often enough to first create the habit of attending. Secondly, attend regularly enough to become a part of the community of support. There are certain aspects of an addicts life that only other addicts will be able to understand. Membership in a 12 step fellowship not only provides a foundation for recovery, but also friendships, fellowship, purpose, and meaning. It is possible to stay sober without membership in a 12 step fellowship. However what is vital to recovery is community, fellowship, purpose and meaning.

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One of the most important aspects and perhaps the one addicts are least equipped to address is the necessity of creating a life of meaning and connection. How to do this is a difficult question to answer and in much detail lies outside the scope of this article. That being said, I think, I can provide some helpful suggestions. Engaging with family is a very important part of recovery. Include the addict in family life and events as much as is possible. The greater the connection becomes between the addict their family and community the harder it becomes to go back to the old way of living. Substance use takes away many of the things that once made life meaningful. In order to help your loved one think back to a time before their addiction really took hold. What were their interests and hobbies? What did they like to do with their free time? Encourage your loved one to return to these interests, especially those that were community based activities.

Finding Meaning and Remaining Accountable

One of the biggest helps you can provide to the addict is to help them feel fully responsible for their life and recovery. Try not to allow the addict to impose on you for money, or other material support. Encourage them instead to be self supporting as much as possible. Support them mentally and emotionally instead of financially and materially. For recovery to be long term the addict must take the lead and be fully responsible for their own lives. As loved ones we can be supportive and compassionate but must be careful not to assume the responsibility for them. If we allow this we may be hindering their growth.

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Our last point is to make sure, as much as possible, that the addict is able to have fun. Life is meant to be enjoyed. If our new life is a happy one it will be harder to return to our old way of living. There is no easily definable recipe for fun. However, if you and your loved one work to accomplish the above points and take some time just to enjoy each other and the new life he or she has been given, this should put you on the right track toward a happy, fun, fulfilling life.

Once again this article is not meant to replace working with a professional. Nor is it within the scope to address each individual situation. Rather it is my hope that it has answered some questions, while maybe posing others, and that it has been able to give some comfort to those who are bound to one suffering from substance use disorder by ties of affection.

 

Until next time
Your friend in service,
Rob Campbell
VP of Communications & Market Development


If you or someone you care about is struggling with substance use disorder, give us a call today. We are happy to answer any questions you may have about our program.

The Evolutionary Foundation of Movement, and its Efficacy in Treating Substance Use Disorder

More Effective Than Any Protocol

Over the last twenty years increasing amounts of research has been done showing the link between exercise and a reduction in all sorts of symptomatic disorders.  It has long been known that exercise is beneficial for reduction in cardiac problems, diabetes, obesity, etc.  What we are now just beginning to understand is how exercise affects the brain.  Recent studies show that exercise is more effective than any other protocol at treating things such as depression, ADHD, PTSD, Alzheimer’s.  Diseases and conditions of the brain.  Much of this research has been done or inspired by the work of John Ratey.  In his groundbreaking book Spark! How Exercise Will Improve the Performance of Your Brain Dr. Ratey showed a link between a regular program and exercise and increased cognition in school children (among many other groundbreaking facts).  In this article I will briefly introduce these topics to the reader, as well as, highlight how Recover Strong takes advantage of this new science in our work of treating substance use disorder and other behavioral health challenges in our patients.  In the header of this article is a short interview of Dr. Ratey that can serve as an introduction to the Dr and his work.  If like me you find the science fascinating I have included at the bottom a much longer discourse on the science given by Dr Ratey at Google headquarters.

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Over the tens of thousands of years of our species evolution natural selection favored those in the population who were most active.  Some experts estimate that during our evolutionary period the average human ran ten to twelve miles per day.  If you were quick and could run far you ate, if you couldn’t you didn’t.  These simple facts charted a course for our species. Our brains developed along with our bodies and so for millenia have been adapted by and for movement.  Since the beginning of the industrial revolution (an incredibly short time period in evolutionary terms) human beings have been moving less and less, this has never been more true than in our contemporary western culture.  As movement has become less central to our daily lives we have seen an increase in the rates of all sorts of negative physical and mental phenomena.  As an example, currently between 35-40% of all adult Americans are obese.  Many of these phenomena, including obesity, have reached epidemic proportions.

How The Brain Is Effected By Exercise On Multiple Levels

The work of Dr Ratey has shown that exercise affects the brain in three primary ways.  The functioning of the brains systems, from a cellular level, and in terms of stimulation new cell growth.  We will look at each in turn.  When we speak of brain systems we are speaking about things like the attention system, the brain’s ability to pay attention to a task.  The memory system which is the mechanism that determines the brain’s ability to retain and recall information, and the motivation system which determines how much motivation we feel for a task.  These are not the only systems in the brain but should give the reader a good general idea of what we mean by systems.  Dr Ratey states, every study that has ever been done on the subject shows that exercise creates increased activity in the parts of the brain that are responsible for controlling these systems.  Second exercise causes a release of neurotransmitters and neurotrophins into the brain.  These brain chemicals are responsible for cell repair, and creating an environment within the brain which inoculates our brain cells from the ravages of stress, and time.  Dr Ratey , calls this “soup” of chemicals Miracle Grow for the brain.  Just as Miracle Grow fertilizes soil to encourage plant growth so to does the soup of neurotransmitters and neurotrophins encourage brain cell repair and growth.  The newest research (and by far the most exciting to me) shows that exercise creates neurogenesis, or the birthing and growth of new brain cells.  We have the ability through exercise to not only repair our brain but to actual improve our brain.   As exciting as these findings are the most amazing conclusion of the research is this, researchers have found nothing that contributes to the repair and creation of new brain cells than exercise.  Current research shows that exercise is a more effective treatment for depression than medications.  These are just two examples of the far reaching implications of this research.  

The Results By The Numbers

Much of the research done in this area has focused on two magic numbers, 45 minutes and 75% of max heart rate.  These are the dual objectives of any program designed to create neuroregeneration.  When an individual operates for 45 minutes or more at or around 75% of their max heart rate they are able to create within themselves a brain environment which is ripe for neuroregeneration and increased levels of neuroplasticity for a period of 2-3 hours.  This means for 2-3 hours post exercise they are able to learn more effectively, and in effect rewire their brains.  With our Recover Strong program on of our primary aims is to take advantage of this time period.  We begin the day with a work out that lasts from 45 minutes to an hour.  Immediately after the work out we engage in a process group, and then into other therapies which are determined from an individual clinical level.  The emotional and stress reducing impacts of the exercise last throughout the day, which is great.  We are on a daily basis, in effect, engaged in a process of rewiring our own brains.  Combining the controlled exercise experience with more traditional therapies has enabled our patients to engage in wholesale transformations.  The results, in many cases, are so profound that they need to be seen to be believed.  As we continue to develop this one of a kind therapeutic model we are planning to include nutritional elements, and additional cognitive methods to encourage neuroregeneration.  At Granite Mountain we are not try to teach our patients new skills alone.  Rather we are engaged in a process that allows our patients to heal their own brains, and transform their lives.  

 

 

Until next time
Your friend in service,
Rob Campbell
VP of Communications and Market Development


If you or somebody you love is in need of help for substance use disorder, contact us today.

Why You Should Consider Going Out Of State For Treatment

When it is time to seek help for drug and alcohol addiction there are many factors that need to be taken into consideration.  The decision whether to stay close to home for treatment or to go out of state can often be seen as a minor part of the decision.  I would urge the reader to weigh the advantages and disadvantages of this decision carefully.  There are many important reasons to seek treatment away from home and some equally good reasons one may choose to stay close.   In this article we will examine these reasons in turn.  This should serve as a good guide for anyone concerned with this aspect of where to pursue treatment.  

   

granite mountain behavioral healthcare

Getting away from it all

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First let’s examine the reasons someone may want to go out of state for treatment.  The first reason that comes to mind is that leaving home will separate an individual from environments and relationships that may be toxic  Addiction does not develop in a vacuum.  Whether its proximity to the bars one frequents or many of the relationships that have created emotional and other challenges for an individual, staying close to home can prove problematic for an addict.  If one seeks treatment geographically remote from home they have effectively removed these potential challenges, at least for a time.  This in many cases makes the commitment to recovery easier.  The distance can also help provide individuals with a different perspective on many of the relationships in their lives, helping them to make more health decisions when considering returning home post treatment.  

Proximity as a Barrier to Success

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Next, if someone decides to go out of state for treatment it becomes much more difficult to decide to leave treatment.  If one is close to home and leave treatment he or she can just go home.  On the other hand if an individual finds themselves in another state they may have to purchase plane tickets, arrange rides, etc.  All of these barrier make the choice to leave treatment more difficult.  Once one has committed to go out of state and have arranged travel these costs are an investment that can not be recouped if they decide not to go or not to stay.  Sometimes these simple barriers are the very thing that encourages an individual to stick it out through the tough times and ultimately find recovery.  

Privacy Concerns

The third consideration is that going away for treatment gives an individual increased levels of privacy.  When staying in one’s home town for treatment it is much more likely that he or she will run into someone they know either in the community or even within the treatment program.  The individual may not be able to determine when and how they will disclose their new way of life to those they know.  These privacy worries can be a major distraction to some clients.  If an individual chooses to go out of state he or she will effectively eliminate these concerns.  

    No Distractions

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Another consideration are the normal day to day distractions of work and family life.  There is nothing inherently wrong with work and family.  In fact for many these form the very essence of a meaningful life.  That said at the outset of the journey of recovery many find it beneficial to get away from it all so they can focus on their recovery for a time.  If one goes out of state to a brand new environment they can anticipate having far less distractions than if they stay close to home.  Having a period of time where the sole focus of one’s life is their recovery can be immensely beneficial.  

A Greater Chance for Success

All of the reasons mentioned above, and several not mentioned result in one simple fact.  The likelihood of success is greater for an individual who goes away from home for treatment.  Every time research is conducted it is found that individuals who go away for treatment have a much higher likelihood of recovering from addiction.  Recent research indicates that there is a 12-15% chance greater likelihood that an individual who goes out of state for treatment will complete their program.  When dealing with addiction and the pain and suffering it causes why wouldn’t we do everything within our power to maximize the chance for success and lasting recovery?

    Proximity to the Love of Family

Above I have enumerated many of the reasons why one would seek to go to treatment away from home.  I would be remiss if I did not include some of the very good reasons for staying close to home for treatment.  The first and most important reason, the proximity of loved ones and family.  Having family close can be a major source of support and inspiration for someone who is new in recovery.  This is of course assuming that family is safe.  Many facilities offer family programs that range from informational, and inspirational, to truly therapeutic.  If family is near they can participate in these programs with the addict.   

“In-Network” or “Out-of-Network”

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Cost is of course an important consideration when making a treatment decision. Several insurance carriers prefer to have patients stay “in-network” when seeking treatment.  Networks are often geographically driven (especially in the case of HMO, and state funded insurance).  Staying in-network for treatment can have a profound impact on the cost of treatment.  How important this consideration is to a family is impossible to gauge from the outside and is a decision each family must make in light of their current financial realities.  

As a final thought, the decision of where to seek treatment is multifaceted, there are many important issues that must be considered.  Geographic proximity is a very important one.  I have tried to present some of the reasons for going out of state, and for staying close to home.  Every individual situation is unique and requires careful consideration before ultimately making the very important decision of where to begin the journey of recovery.  There is no one right answer for all.

If you or a loved one is considering your treatment options an would like an open and frank conversation about how to make this decision please contact us we would be happy to help.

Until next time
Your friend in service,
Rob Campbell

VP of Communications & Market Development


If you or someone you love is in need of help for substance use disorder please don’t hesitate to give us a call today. We understand and we are happy to help.

What To Expect During The Alcohol Detox Process

granite mountain behavioral healthcare

We have received many questions lately through our website, social media, and intake line related to the process of alcohol detox. As a result I thought I would write an article laying out the detox process as it relates to alcohol use disorder. I will endeavor to cover the stages of detox, the symptoms associated with each, and some tips on how to make the process easier. 

I would like to start by stating some facts which are germain to the topic.

  1. Alcohol is the third leading cause of preventable deaths in the United States.  Almost 90,000 people a year die of alcohol related deaths in this country

  2. 1 out of every 3 emergency room visits in the United States is related to alcohol use

  3. More than 17.6 million Americans suffer from some form of Alcohol use disorder

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The above statistics make clear the scope and nature of the social problem that alcohol use disorder presents. It affects every community in our country, and many families. If you or a loved one are suffering from alcohol use disorder know that you are not alone, and that help is available if you want it.

When an individual who has been drinking excessively decides that it is time to stop drinking it is seldom wise to undertake this process alone.  Rather it is advisable to place yourself under the care of a doctor or other medical professional.  It is perhaps because of the wide acceptance of drinking in our society that many underestimate the severity of the alcohol withdrawal process, thinking it “won’t be that bad”. Conversely the alcohol detox process can be one of the most challenging both mentally and medically speaking.  The withdrawal process from alcohol is most often characterized as having three distinct phases. They are:

  • Phase 1 typically begins from 6 hours to 24 hours after an individual last consumes alcohol.  The severity of the the symptoms during this phase will be determined by how long and how much alcohol a person has been consuming.  The typical symptoms of the first phase of withdrawal can include; nervousness, anxiety, headache, nausea, vomiting, tremors, loss of appetite, tremors, and mood swings.

The first phase of withdrawal can last for anywhere between 24 and 72 hours. 

  • Phase 2 typically sets in from 24 to 72 hours after an individual last consumed alcohol.  The typical symptoms of this phase can include; increased levels of mental confusion, irregular heart rate, difficulty breathing, muscle rigidity, increased blood pressure, and in some cases hallucinations.  It ought to be clear that this phase is potentially much more dangerous to an individual, and often requires one be under the care of trained medical staff.

  • About one out of three people enter into phase 3 of withdrawal from alcohol.  This phase is called Delirium Tremens (DT).  A person can enter DT anywhere from 3 days after cessation of drinking to as long as 2 weeks after last consuming alcohol.  This phase of withdrawal is the most dangerous and absolutely requires an individual to be in some form of inpatient treatment.  Some of the symptoms include; disorientation, dissociation, hallucination, Grand Mal seizures, and in some cases death.

If you or a loved one are considering cessation of drinking, consult with a medical professional and seek treatment. There are many medications available to help ease the symptoms of detox from alcohol, and a trained medical professional can help you to make sound decisions as to their potential to help. 

The withdrawal process from alcohol can be dangerous and the decision to undertake the process can be frightening.  However, if you or a loved one is in a position where life is becoming impossible it is important not to let the fear of detox keep you from transforming your life.  Many of us have been through it and when we look back believe it was the most important decision we have ever made.  It is my hope that this short article has answered many of the questions the reader may have regarding the process of detox.  If after reading this you still have questions or concerns please reach out to our team.  We are happy to help whether you utilize our services or not.  The most important thing to us is that you or your loved one gets the help they need.

 

Your friend in service,
Rob Campbell

VP of Communications & Market Development


If you would like to speak to a professional about treatment for you or your loved one, please don’t hesitate to contact us today!


1. CDC, Fact Sheets: Alcohol Use and Your Health (2018), https://www.cdc.gov/alcohol/fact-sheets/alcohol-use.htm.

2. Lisa Mahapatra, 1 out of 3 ER Visits Are Alcohol Related (IBT: 2013), http://www.ibtimes.com/1-out-3-er-visits-are-alcohol-related-heres-what-patients-drank-charts-1395699.

3. NCADD, Facts About Alcohol (2015), https://www.ncadd.org/about-addiction/alcohol/facts-about-alcohol.